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PEACOCK, [Alfred?]
[CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY: Historically Important Album with Fourteen Original Watercolours of South Eastern British Columbia Including the Canadian Pacific Railway Titled on the Spine:] B.C. & C.P.R. Album.


1886. Oblong Folio (ca. 29x40cm). Fourteen album leaves with fourteen mounted watercolours ca. 20,5x31 cm (8 x 12 in.) and slightly smaller, all titled and two dated. Recent period style blue half morocco album with cloth boards, spine with raised bands and gilt lettered title. A very good album with beautiful watercolours. Attractive album with fourteen watercolours of south-eastern British Columbia including the Canadian Pacific Railway including: 1) Moberly Peak. - 1st Columbia Crossing. - Kicking Horse Pass; 2) Moberly Peak. - Mouth of Kicking Horse Pass. - Rocky Mountains. -Valley of Columbia, Selkirks. Columbia R.; 3) Graves alongside the dump. C.P.R.; 4) C.P.R. Snow Sheds in the Mountains.; 5) Kicking Horse Pass. Canadian Pacific Railway; 6) Packing over the Mountains; 7) Selkirks from high ground near "1st crossing of Columbia R.;" 8) Bit of the Rockies near mouth of Blackberry R. - Columbia R. In foreground; 9) Going down the Columbia - Oct. 1886; 10) On the Columbia R.; 11) Law's Ranche - Head of Columbia River Oct. 1886; 12) Engineers Office - Gaol - Court House - Stoess [Stores?]; 13) Landing at Golden City - Columbia River; 14) Kicking Horse River - Selkirk Range - Golden City (Pig - Queens Hotel - R. Lang's Store - Pat's House). Peacock was no doubt one of the transcontinental passengers who travelled and documented the C.P.R. in 1886, the first year of its operation. "The last spike in the CPR was driven on 7 November 1885, by one of its directors, Donald Smith, but so many cost-cutting shortcuts were taken in constructing the railway that regular transcontinental service could not start for another seven months while work was done to improve the railway's condition (part of this was due to snow in the mountains and lack of snow sheds to keep the line open).., The first transcontinental passenger train departed from Montreal's Dalhousie Station, located at Berri Street and Notre Dame Street at 8 pm on 28 June 1886, and arrived at Port Moody at noon on 4 July 1886" (Wikipedia).

$8500.00 USD


   
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