January 2013 - Exploration, Travel and Voyages: Maps, Prints and Posters


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1. [AFGHANISTAN]
[Large Folding Map of Afghanistan: Scale 1 Inch to 24 Miles].

Dehra Dun: Survey of India, 1883. Lithographed map ca. 96 x 115 cm (46 x 38 inches) dissected and linen-backed with some routes and borders in colour. Housed in the original publisher's blind stamped green gilt cloth covers. Very minor tears on the spine’s head and tail. The map is in sound, clean condition with just a few small ink or pencil marks, mainly a short underlining of important cities, a contemporary signature in the bottom left margin reads "Nicolson." A very good map.
The map "Enlarged at the Survey of India, Trigonometrical Branch, from the 6th Edition of the Map of Turkestan by Lieu-General J.T. Walker, RE, Surveyor General of India" is in a scale of 1 inch to 24 miles. The Turkestan Map, from which this Afghan section was taken and enlarged, was one much favoured by players of the Great game and incorporated surveys up to 1882 much improving it over earlier editions as it benefitted from the continued labours of such Survey leaders as Montgomerie and his Pundits and the greater range of Russian maps available following the country's rapid military advance towards the Pamirs. The map extends from the north where it shows Merv, Balkh and Faizabad, as far south as Jacobabbad and Shirkapur in the lower Indus Valley and from Mashad and Turbat-i-Haidar in the west to Srinagar in Kashmir and Ferozepore in the Punjab in the east. The print run appears to have been 1200 for this map. An excellent detailed map for studying Afghanistan, its borders and the North West Frontier at a period of international tension.


2. [AFRICA]
VANDERMAELEN, Philippe (1791-1869)
Atlas Universel de Geographie Physique, Politique, Statistique et Mineralogique, sur l'echelle de 1/1641836 ou d'une ligne par 1900 toises, dresse par Ph. Vandermaelen, Membre de la Societe de Geographie de Paris, d'apres les meilleures cartes, observations astronomiques et voyages dans les divers Pays de la Terre; Lithographie par H. Ode, Membre de la Societe de Geographie de Paris - Troisieme Partie - Afrique [Atlas of Universal Geography... Third Part - Africa].

Brussels: Lithographed by H. Ode, 1827. First Edition. Elephant Folio. With a printed title page and sixty large outline hand coloured lithographed maps. The unfolded maps are loosely housed in a handsome period brown gilt tooled diced half morocco portfolio with marbled boards. Portfolio incorrectly labelled Europe, otherwise a near fine set of maps.
The "Atlas Universel" by Vandermaelen, the founder of the Etablissement Geographique de Bruxellesis, is "thought to be the first world atlas on a uniform scale and the first to be produced by lithography" (Tooley Q-Z, p.311).The index map of this third part, "Carte D'Assemblage de L'Afrique" shows how the map of Africa is divided into 57 maps and two supplemental maps. The Azores, Canary Islands, Cape Verde Islands, Madagascar and the coastal areas of Africa are covered as well as most of North Africa. However, the interior of large parts of sub-Saharan Africa are not mapped and are labelled "Pays inconnu aux Europeens [country unknown to Europeans]."
"The maps in the ["Atlas Universel"] make up the first map of the world on a uniform scale, constructed as a modified conical projection and, if assembled, forming a globe with a diameter of 7.75 metres, although only one such was known to have been made, by the author himself, and requiring a specially designed room. It offered the largest picture of the earth's surface available in the nineteenth century, thereby giving the lesser known areas such as Australia, South Africa and the West coast of America, all developing countries, a much greater coverage than before" (Sotheby's); Koeman III, Vdm.I; NMM 3:179; Phillips, Atlases 749; Sabin 43762.


3. [BARNARD(?), Frederick Lamport]
[Manuscript Map of Central Madagascar].

Mar. 17 1848. Manuscript map ca. 32 x 41 cm (13 x 16 inches). Original manuscript map in pen on bluish paper. Folded, slightly age-toned otherwise in very good condition.
This interesting and important map dated March 17th 1848 has the following note:
"N.B. Antsianaka, Imerina, and Betsileo are the three most central provinces of Madagascar, and believed to be by far the most populous. 2. The country between the coast and the plateau of the interior is forest and very thinly inhabited."
Possibly drawn by Frederick Lamport Barnard (Author of: 'A three years' cruize in the Mozambique Channel for the suppression of the slave trade'), this map of central Madagascar shows the areas of influence of the London Missionary Society, the Church Missionary Society and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. The main cities, mountains and rivers are also drawn in as well as the unexplored areas.
This map of the main population centers of Madagascar was made during the "33-year reign of Queen Ranavalona I (Ranavalona the Cruel), the widow of Radama I. [It] began inauspiciously with the queen murdering the dead king’s heir and other relatives. The aristocrats and sorcerers (who had lost influence under the liberal régime of the previous two Merina kings) re-asserted their power during the reign of Ranavalona I. The queen repudiated the treaties that Radama I had signed with Britain..., She issued a royal edict prohibiting the practice of Christianity in Madagascar, expelled British missionaries from the island, and persecuted Christian converts who would not renounce their religion. Christian customs are not the customs of our ancestors, she explained. The queen scrapped the legal reforms started by Andrianampoinimerina in favour of the old system of trial by ordeal" (Wikipedia). "An ill-managed attack by combined British and French forces on Tamatave in 1846 led to the total exclusion of all Europeans, and foreign commerce almost ceased" (Howgego 1800-1850, M5).


4. [BRAMBILA, Fernando] (1763-1832)
[Malaspina Expedition] Sepulcro del Gefe anterior a el actual del Puerto de Mulgrave, muerto segun indicios en una Reyerta [Tombstone of a Chief in the Vicinity of Port Mulgrave, who died in a Skirmish According to the Evidence; Artist Proof Plate Meant for a Seven Volume Work Which was Suppressed and Remained Unpublished].

[Madrid?], [1798?]. Uncoloured aquatint, printed image ca. 27 x 47 cm (10.5 x 18.5 inches). A near fine wide margined aquatint.
Extremely Rare artist's proof aquatint produced for a work which was never published. Worldcat only locates one copy of this print. This aquatint show Port Mulgrave on Khantaak Island, Alaska. The Malaspina Expedition arrived at Port Mulgrave on the 27th of June, 1791 and the Expedition stayed there for ten days. This aquatint shows a Tlingit burial site and tombstone for a Chief who died in battle.
The artist of this aquatint, Brambila, joined as a painter the scientific expedition of Alejandro Malaspina (1789-1794), which explored and mapped much of the west coast of the Americas from Cape Horn to the Gulf of Alaska. Brambila painted several landscapes of Guam, the Philippines, Australia (Sydney), Macao, Peru, Chile and Argentina and the Pacific Northwest. After returning to Spain, he worked on producing prints based of his paintings and drawings made on the voyage, in preparation for the publication of the account of the Malaspina Expedition. Unfortunately, Malaspina's political judgment lead him to take part in a failed conspiracy to overthrow Spain's Prime Minister Godoy, and he was arrested on charges of plotting against the state. After an inconclusive trial on April 20, 1796, Charles IV decreed that Malaspina be stripped of rank and imprisoned in the isolated fortress of San Antón in La Coruña, Galicia (Spain), where he remained from 1796 to 1802.
As a result, his seven-volume account of the Expedition was suppressed and remained unpublished until the late 19th century. Thus this aquatint is a very rare contemporary pictorial survivor of the expedition. Hakluyt Society, The Malaspina Expedition; Howgego M26; Wikipedia.


5. [BRAMBILA, Fernando] (1763-1832)
[Malaspina Expedition] Vista de una Galeria natural de cien pies de largo y diez de ancho, en la inmediacion del Puerto del Decanso, en el Estrecho de Juan de Fuca [View of a Natural Gallery of one Hundred feet long and ten wide, in the Proximity of the Port of Decanso [Gabriola Island B.C.], in the Strait of Juan de Fuca; Artist Proof Plate Meant for a Seven Volume Work Which was Suppressed and Remained Unpublished].

[Madrid?], [1798?]. Uncoloured aquatint, printed image ca. 26 x 49 cm (10 ½ x 19 ½ in). A near fine wide margined aquatint.
Extremely Rare artist's proof aquatint produced for a work which was never published. Worldcat only locates one copy of this print. This aquatint show the natural gallery on Gabriola Island.
The artist of this aquatint, Brambila, joined as a painter the scientific expedition of Alejandro Malaspina (1789-1794), which explored and mapped much of the west coast of the Americas from Cape Horn to the Gulf of Alaska. Brambila painted several landscapes of Guam, the Philippines, Australia (Sydney), Macao, Peru, Chile and Argentina and the Pacific Northwest. After returning to Spain, he worked on producing prints based on his paintings and drawings made on the voyage, in preparation for the publication of the account of the Malaspina Expedition. Unfortunately, Malaspina's political judgment lead him to take part in a failed conspiracy to overthrow Spain's Prime Minister Godoy, and he was arrested on charges of plotting against the state. After an inconclusive trial on April 20, 1796, Charles IV decreed that Malaspina be stripped of rank and imprisoned in the isolated fortress of San Antón in La Coruña, Galicia (Spain), where he remained from 1796 to 1802.
As a result, his seven-volume account of the Expedition was suppressed and remained unpublished until the late 19th century. Thus, this aquatint is a very rare contemporary pictorial survivor of the expedition. Hakluyt Society, The Malaspina Expedition; Howgego M26; Humphrey, Malaspina's Lost Gallery; Wikipedia.


6. [CARMELITE MISSIONS IN SOUTHERN INDIA]
Carte des missions des pères Carmes Déchaussés dans les Royames de Travancore et de Cochin au Malabar (Indes Anglaises) [Map of the Missions of the Barefoot Carmelite Fathers in the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin or Malabar (British India)].

Bruges: Société de St. Augustine, ca. 1900. Large folding colour lithograph map, ca. 130x80 cm (51.5 x 31.5 in). P. Raoux del. Period red publisher’s cloth with gilt lettered title and a decorative rear endpaper. Map weak at folds, with a couple of minor tears (on folds); cover with some minor wear at extremities but overall a very good map.
Very rare map as only one copy found in Worldcat.
The map shows Carmelite dioceses and missions in southwestern India, from the territories under the control of Italian Jesuits in Mangalore in the north to Cape Comorin in the south. The territories of the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin are marked as zones of influence of the Carmelite Archdiocese of Verrapoly, Dioceses of Quilon and Cochin, Apostolic Vicariate of Trichoor, Vicariat of Changanacherry and numerous missions. The map is very detailed and shows the borders between the dioceses and missions; all cities and villages with catholic churches belonging to the Carmelites or other catholic orders; roads and railways, tea and coffee plantations, steamer routes et al. Interesting is that the part of the Western Ghats south of the Peermade hill station was marked as ‘high mountains covered with impenetrable forest’ and consequently didn’t have any missions. The inset map in the corner shows the steamship routes to India: through the Suez Canal to Bombay, along the Malabar coast to Cape Comorin, Ceylon and Calcutta. The map is decorated with the emblem of the Carmelite order and its motto "Zelo zelatus sum pro Domino Deo exercituum."
"The Discalced Carmelites came to India in the beginning of the 17th century. They founded their first residence at Tatta in Sind, now in Pakistan, and the second, in Goa in 1620. The missionary activities of the Carmelites extended to the great Mughal Empire, Goa, Surat, Bijapur, Bombay, Karwar etc. In 1656 Pope Alexander VII sent two groups of Discalced Carmelites to Malabar <..,> to settle the dispute and bring harmony between the St. Thomas Christians and their Jesuit Archbishop of Cranganore. Though intended as a temporary mission, events turned in such a way that the Carmelite mission in Kerala came to be permanent. They have made significant contributions to the Church in Kerala by their persistent activities especially in the pastoral care of the faithful, reunion movement, evangelization of non-Christians, formation of native clergy, founding of the native religious congregations and socio-educational activities <..,> The work of the Carmelite missionaries in India could not be considered complete without the establishment of the Carmelite Order in the country. In 1901 the construction of a Carmelite monastery with the Novitiate was started at Cotton Hill in Thiruvananthapuram, which was christened Carmel Hill. The new building was blessed in 1906 by Msgr. A.M. Benziger, Bishop of Quilon and declared a Novitiate House in 1911. Shortly after the novitiate was temporally closed and reopened in 1928" (Malabar Province of the Discalced Carmelites on-line).


7. [CAUCASUS]
Karta Kavkazskogo Kraia [Map of the Caucasus Province].

Saint Petersburg: Kartograficheskoe Zavedenie A. Ilyina, ca. 1880. Ca. 81 x 108,5 cm (32x 43 inches) Large folding chromolithographed map, dissected and linen backed, with two metal rivets to hang the map; outline hand coloured. Scale: 30 verst in 1 inch (1/1,080,000). Original publisher’s cardboard slipcase. Slipcase worn and rubbed, with a crack on the side, but the map is in very good, strong and clean condition.
Large colour wall map of the Caucasus Province of the Russian Empire with detailed information on the cities and settlements, roads, rivers and the relief of the Caucasian mountains. The map covers the area from the Astrakhan province in the north to the Persian and Turkish borders in the south, from the Black Sea with the Strait of Kerch in the west to the Caspian Sea in the east, thus showing the territories of modern Krasnodar and Stavropol Krai, Kalmykia, Northern Ossetia, Chechnya and Dagestan et al, Georgia, Armenia and Aserbaijan. The main map is supplemented with four inset plans of the Caucasian cities (Vladikavkaz, Baku, Kutais and Mineralnye Vody), two maps of Mt. Elbrus and Mt. Kazbek with surroundings, and a list of the administrative divisions of the Caucasus Region of the Russian Empire.
The map was issued by the first Russian specialized cartographic publishing house of Alexey Ilyin (1832-1889), which was founded in Saint Petersburg in 1859 and was one of the best Russian map printers of all times. The most famous Ilyin’s editions were "The Detailed Atlas of the Russian Empire with the plans of the main cities" (70 maps, 1871), and "The Detailed Atlas of all parts of the world" (63 maps, 1884); Ilyin also issued numerous maps and atlases for the public and private institutions, several geographical magazines and travel guides, coloured maps and plates for the Russian edition of the Brokhaus dictionary; illustrated books for the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Geographical Society and Russian Academy of Arts. Ilyin’s maps won several awards at Russian and international fairs. Our map of the Caucasus Province was issued as a part of the Ilyin’s atlas of the Russian Empire (Saint Petersburg - Petrograd - Leningrad: Encyclopaedia. Moscow, 1992).


8. [DANISH EAST INDIA COMPANY]
[View and Plan of the Danish Fort Dansburg and Tranquebar] Das Königl. Dänische Castel Dansburg und die Stadt Trankenbar auf der Custe Coromandel in Ost Indien.

Ca. 1650-1700. Copper engraving, printed image ca. 32,5 x39 cm (13 x 15.5 inches). Slightly age-toned, original folds, otherwise a very good engraving.
Very rare as only two copies found in Worldcat (University of Oxford and Harvard University). Interesting early engraved view and plan of the Danish Fort Dansburg and Tranquebar city (modern Tharangambadi, Western India). This panoramic view was taken from the sea and shows the fort, the town nearby and a group of Danish ships in the foreground. The plan of the fort is placed under the view; both images are supplemented with extensive indexes.
The copy of the University of Oxford was dated 1650 on suggestion of the Bodleian Library based on the style of ships in the view. The other possibility is that it is out of the "Kurtzgefasste Missions-Geschichte oder historischer Auszug der evangelischen Missions-Berichte aus Ost-Indien, 1705-1736"by Johann Lucas Niekamp (2 vols., Halle, 1740-1772).
"Tranquebar was founded by the Danish East India Company in 1620, when a factory (commercial settlement) was opened and a fort, known as Fort Dansborg, was built by a Danish captain named Ove Gjedde. This fort was the residence and headquarters of the governor and other officials for about 150 years. It is now a museum hosting a collection of artifacts from the colonial era" (Wikipedia).



9. [EGYPT]
[View of the Colossi of Memnon] Memnonsaeulen/ Oberaegypten (Theben).

Hand coloured lithograph ca. 27 x 33 cm (11 x 13 inches). Recently matted, otherwise near fine lithograph.
Colourful lithograph view of the Colossi of Memnon (Theban necropolis, Luxor), with two Arab riders in the foreground. The lithograph has a decorative border with Egyptian ornaments.
"The Colossi of Memnon (known to locals as el-Colossat, or es-Salamat) are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3400 years (since 1350 BC) they have stood in the Theban necropolis, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor.
The twin statues depict Amenhotep III (fl. 14th century BC) in a seated position, his hands resting on his knees and his gaze facing eastwards (actually SSE in modern bearings) towards the river. Two shorter figures are carved into the front throne alongside his legs: these are his wife Tiy and mother Mutemwiya. The side panels depict the Nile god Hapy. The stone platforms on which they stand - themselves about 4 m (13 ft) - the colossi reach a towering 18 m (60 ft) in height and weigh an estimated 720 tons each The two figures are about 15 m (50 ft) apart.
The original function of the Colossi was to stand guard at the entrance to Amenhotep's memorial temple (or mortuary temple): a massive cult centre built during the pharaoh's lifetime, where he was worshipped as a god-on-earth both before and after his departure from this world. In its day, this temple complex was the largest and most opulent in Egypt. Covering a total of 35 hectares (86 acres), even later rivals such as Ramesses II's Ramesseum or Ramesses III's Medinet Habu were unable to match it in area; even the Temple of Karnak, as it stood in Amenhotep's time, was smaller" (Wikipedia).


<

strong>10. [ENGRAVED PORTRAIT OF COLUMBUS]
VAZQUEZ, Bartolomè (1749-1802)
Cristoval Colon Almirante Mayor Del Mar Occeano, Virrey y Governador General de las Yndias, su Descubridor y Conquistador. Copiado de un Quadro Origl que se conserva en la Familia.
[Madrid], 1791. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 28.5 x 18.5 cm (11.5 x 7.5 inches). Closely cropped on top and bottom, not affecting image, otherwise a very good copper engraving.
Very rare engraved portrait of Christopher Columbus with only one copy found in Worldcat (National Library of Spain).
“The origin of the Cladera, Muñoz and Vasquez pictures, and of the high-relief in the Cathedral at Havana, is very curious. About the end of the last century, the Duke of Veragua found among the collection of pictures belonging to the family, a beautiful painting of a man seated on a sort of a throne, attired as a grandee of Spain, bearing the inscription of D. Cristobal Colon. Believing it to be the picture of the great Admiral, he at once instructed the celebrated engraver Vasquez to make a copper-plate of it, stating that the original was in the gallery of the family. As the Vasquez engraving was a magnificent work of art and the engraver had the high authority of a descendant of Columbus as to its authenticity, no doubt was entertained as to the correctness of the claim. Muñoz accepted the picture as did Cladera, and when the high-relief was ordered for the Cathedral at Havana, this engraving was the original from which it was taken, no attention being paid to the anachronisms in the dress and the type of the picture, which cannot possibly be a portrait of Columbus if we consult the pen portraits of him left by his contemporaries.
This engraving bas been widely copied: the more especially because it had been accepted by such eminent authorities as Muñoz and Cladera. The beautiful original of this engraving was never intended as a portrait of the Admiral, but of his grandson, Cristobal Colon y Toledo, brother of the third Admiral of the Indies, D. Luis, the son of D. Diego, son of the Discoverer. The age, type, and accessories of the picture <…>, which is still in the Veragua gallery, agree exactly with the appearance of the person whom it is now known to represent.
The engraving is of large size and bears the inscription: —"CHRISTOVAL COLON—COPIADO DE UN QUADRO ORIGL., QUE SE CONSERVA EN LA FAMILIA—BART VAZQUE LA GRABO 1791." It is a three quarter-length portrait of Columbus, in which he is represented as a young man clad in armor with a ruff around the neck. He wears a mustache and goatee and holds a globe in his right hand and in the left a baton of command” (Ponce de Leon, N. The Columbus Gallery. The “Discoverer of the New World” as represented in portraits, monuments, statues, medals and paintings. New York, 1893, p. 68).


11. [FLAMENG, Leopold]
[Etching of Sir Richard Francis Burton (1821-1890) after a painting by Sir Frederick Leighton].

[1879]. Etching ca. 22 x 18cm (8.5 x 7 inches). A near fine wide margined etching.
This rare etching is based on the portrait by "Frederic Leighton, Baron Leighton (1830-1896). This austere, ponderous and intense image of one of the great explorers of Victorian England captures his slightly brutal character very effectively. The artist Frederic Leighton met Burton in 1869 while they were taking a cure at Vichy and they formed a firm friendship which lasted until Burton's death. On 26 April 1872, Burton began sitting for his portrait. According to Lady Burton, he was extraordinarily difficult about it, anxious that his necktie and pin might be omitted and pleading with the artist, 'Don't make me ugly, there's a good fellow.' Apparently the portrait was left unfinished when Burton departed for Trieste in October 1872 and it was not completed until 1875. It was exhibited at the Royal Academy the following year, but it is possible that Burton did not like it, because Leighton kept it at his house in Kensington. He intended to leave it to the National Portrait Gallery, of which he was a Trustee, but forgot, so the then Director, Lionel Cust, arranged for it to be donated by Leighton's sisters" (National Portrait Gallery).
"Captain Sir Richard Francis Burton was a British geographer, explorer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, cartographer, ethnologist, spy, linguist, poet, fencer and diplomat. He was known for his travels and explorations within Asia, Africa and the Americas as well as his extraordinary knowledge of languages and cultures. According to one count, he spoke 29 European, Asian and African languages.
Burton's best-known achievements include travelling in disguise to Mecca, an unexpurgated translation of One Thousand and One Nights (also commonly called The Arabian Nights in English after Andrew Lang's abridgement), bringing the Kama Sutra to publication in English, and journeying with John Hanning Speke as the first Europeans led by Africa's greatest explorer guide, Sidi Mubarak Bombay, utilizing route information by Indian and Omani merchants who traded in the region, to visit the Great Lakes of Africa in search of the source of the Nile. Burton extensively criticized colonial policies (to the detriment of his career) in his works and letters. He was a prolific and erudite author and wrote numerous books and scholarly articles about subjects including human behaviour, travel, falconry, fencing, sexual practices and ethnography. A unique feature of his books is the copious footnotes and appendices containing remarkable observations and unexpurgated information" (Wikipedia).



12. [GORDON OF KHARTOUM]
Major General Charles George Gordon. C.B. R.E. Hero of Khartoum.

London: Marlborough, Gould and Co. Publishers, ca. 1880. Lithograph, printed image ca. 49x32,5 cm (17x13 inches). Proof copies 5 s. each. Tears and minor losses on extremities, otherwise a very good wide margined lithograph.
Large well executed lithograph portrait of Major-General Charles George Gordon, CB (1833-1885), known as Chinese Gordon, Gordon Pasha, and Gordon of Khartoum. "It may not be out of place to mention that by far the best portrait of General Gordon , to our mind, is a large lithograph published by Marlborough and Co., 52, old Bailey, London, and within reach of all purses" (General Gordon’s life and letters // Littell’s The Living Age. Fifth Series, Vol. 1. Boston, 1885. P. 465).
"Major-General Charles George Gordon, was a British army officer and administrator. He made his military reputation in China, where he was placed in command of the "Ever Victorious Army", a force of Chinese soldiers led by European officers. In the early 1860s, Gordon and his men were instrumental in putting down the Taiping Rebellion, regularly defeating much larger forces. For these accomplishments, he was given the nickname "Chinese" Gordon and honours from both the Emperor of China and the British.
He entered the service of the Khedive in 1873 (with British government approval) and later became the Governor-General of the Sudan, where he did much to suppress revolts and the slave trade. When a serious revolt broke out in the Sudan, led by a Muslim reformer and self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad, Gordon was sent to Khartoum with instructions to secure the evacuation of loyal soldiers and civilians, and depart with them. After evacuating about 2,500 British civilians he retained a smaller group of soldiers and non-military men. As an ardent Christian evangelist he was determined to stand up to the Mahdi, his Muslim nemesis. In the build up to battle the two leaders corresponded attempting to convert the other to their respective faiths, but neither would comply. Besieged by the Mahdi's forces, Gordon organized a city-wide defence lasting almost a year that gained him the admiration of the British public, though not the government, which had not wished to become involved (as Gordon had known before setting out). Only when public pressure to act had become too great was a relief force reluctantly sent. It arrived two days after the city had fallen and Gordon had been beheaded" (Wikipedia).



13. [GREAT GAME]
JOHNSTON, W. & A.K. W. & A.K. Johnstons' Special Map to Elucidate the Russo-Afghan Boundary Question.

Edinburg & London: W. & A.K. Johnston, [1885]. Large folding colour lithographed map dissected into 16 parts, mounted on linen. Map ca. 47 x 71 cm (19 x 28 inches). Original publisher’s brown cloth covers with gilt lettered title "Map showing the Russo-Afghan Boundaries." Covers neatly rebacked, linen with minor tear on one fold, otherwise a very good map.
Very rare map with only four copies found in Worldcat. The map shows the territories of the Russian Empire, British India, Afghanistan, Persia and still independent khanates of Bukhara and Khiva. The main attention is paid to the disputed territory around the oasis of Panjdeh which shortly before had become the area of battle between Russian and Afghan forces in the course of Russian expansion south.
"The incident soured the relations between Britain and Russia, but outright war was averted with diplomacy. Lord Dufferin managed to secure a settlement in which Russia kept the Merv Oasis and Pandjeh to the south of it, but relinquished an important pass further west and promised to respect Afghan territorial integrity in the future. Following the incident, the Anglo-Russian Boundary Commission was established to delineate the northern frontier of Afghanistan. The commission did not have any Afghan involvement, and effectively led to Afghanistan becoming a buffer state between British India and the Russian Empire. The incident brought the southward expansion of Imperial Russia to a halt. The Russians founded the border town of Kushka in the conquered territory; it was the southernmost settlement of both the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union" (Wikipedia).
The map is supplemented with three inset maps showing the enlargement view of the disputed territory; growth of the Russian Empire towards India since Peter the Great to the present time; and a map showing the territory of the British Empire with the distances between its parts. Also the railways of British India are shown, both operational and in construction.
"At the present time, when the Anglo-Russian Commission are about to survey a mutual boundary line, this map is likely to be of great use in following the movements of the Afghan frontier. A glance at the insert map will show the continued advance of Russia towards India during the past four centuries, and the extension of the railway system in the same direction, which at the present time has reached Orenburg in the north, and beyond Kizil Arvat, in the Turkistan, in the south. A small inset map is also given, showing British possessions in Asia, Africa and Australasia, with the distances between them" (Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society. New Monthly Series. Vol.VII. London, 1885, p. 265).



14. [IRAN]
MORGAN, Jean-Jaques de (1857-1924); LEROUX, E. (editor)

[Five Large Folding Maps of Iran Including:] Carte de l’Élam: Kourdistân (pars), Louristân, Khouzistân, ou Arabistân ca. 87x 55,5 cm (34 x 22 inches); Carte de la partie centrale du Kurdistan (in 2 parts, each ca. 97 x 62,5 cm (38.5 x 24.5 inches); Carte des Rives méridionales de la Mer Caspienne entre l’atrek et la frontière Russe du Lenkorân (in 2 parts, each ca. 81,5 x 78,5 cm (32x31 inches).
Paris: Erhard Fres., ca. 1891. Five colour lithograph linen backed maps. 19th century bookseller’s paper labels on verso of maps. Minor foxing of the linen backing, otherwise very good wide margined maps.
The maps were based on Morgan’s travels across the region in December 1890 - September 1891; as well as Kiepert’s map of the Asiatic Turkey (1883). The maps include topographical data about the altitudes, rivers, swamps, forests and agricultural lands; modern cities and villages, routes and roads, bridges, mines et al. They thoroughly mark the ancient castles, ruins and tombs, antique bás-reliefs and inscriptions; there are also ethnographical notes about local people and tribes.
The map of the Central Kurdistan shows the famous salt Urmia Lake and has a small additional plan of the Cavernes d’Issakent.
"Jean-Jacques de Morgan was a French mining engineer, geologist, and archaeologist. He was the director of Antiquities in Egypt during the 19th century, and excavated in Memphis and Dashur, providing many drawings of many Egyptian pyramids. He also worked at Stonehenge, and Persepolis, and many other sites" (Wikipedia).
In 1890 "the French ministry of public education entrusted him with his first official mission to Persia. En route he paused to explore the necropolis at Telovan near Tbilisi, then went on to Tehran, whence he paid visits to Māzandarān, to Gīlān, and farther west to Ṭāle," in order to study dialects. From Ṭāle "he traveled south across Kurdistan and Luristan, combining both geological and archeological investigations. He was the first to recognize, at Qaṣr-e 'īrīn, the presence of oil in the vast fold system of the Zagros <..,> De Morgan’s journey ended in Susiana, where he attempted to retrace the routes of the Assyrian campaigns in Elam" (Encyclopaedia Iranica on-line). The result of the travel was the establishment of the France’s monopoly for the archaeological research in Persia and Morgan’s book: "Mission scientifique en Perse" (5 parts comprising 10 vols., Paris, 1894-1905), including four volumes of geological studies; two volumes of archeological studies on tombs and other monuments; one volume devoted to Kurdish dialects and the languages of northern Persia; one volume of Mandaean texts; and two volumes of geographical studies (Encyclopaedia Iranica on-line).


15. [JAPAN TRAVEL POSTER]
KAMIMURA, SHOEN
"Classical Dance" / Board of Tourist Industry – Japanese Government Railroad.

Tokyo: Kyodo Printing & Co, ca. 1937. Colour lithograph poster ca. 99 x 57 cm (39 x 22.5 inches) A near fine poster.
Attractive large color lithographed poster showing a dancing Geisha dressed in a Kimono, issued by the Board of Tourist Industry of the Japanese Government Railroad as a part of promotion to attract westerners to visit Japan.
"The Japanese Government Railways (JGR) was the national railway system directly operated by the central government of Japan until 1949. It is a predecessor of Japanese National Railways and the Japan Railways Group. One of the roles of the Japanese Government Railways was to attract foreign tourists to Japan. In 1930, the government created the Board of Tourist Industry (Kokusai Kankō Kyoku) as a section of the Japanese Government Railways (Ministry of Railways). The Board printed and distributed picture posters and English guidebooks overseas and encouraged development of resort hotels at home. The Board was dissolved in 1942, following the breakout of the Pacific War in 1941" (Wikipedia).
See also: Nakagawa, K. Prewar Tourism Promotion by Japanese Government Railways// Japan Railway & Transport Review. March 1998. P. 22-27.



16. [JAPAN TRAVEL POSTER]
KAMIMURA, SHOEN
Japan / Board of Tourist Industry - Japanese Government Railroad.

Tokyo: Kyodo Printing & Co. Ltd., ca. 1938. Colour process lithograph ca. 97 x 63 cm (38.5 x 25 inches). Poster in near fine condition.
Large color lithographed poster showing deer in a traditional Japanese garden (most likely in Nara), issued by the Board of Tourist Industry of the Japanese Government Railroad as a part of promotion to attract westerners to visit Japan.
"The Japanese Government Railways (JGR) was the national railway system directly operated by the central government of Japan until 1949. It is a predecessor of Japanese National Railways and the Japan Railways Group. One of the roles of the Japanese Government Railways was to attract foreign tourists to Japan. In 1930, the government created the Board of Tourist Industry (Kokusai Kankō Kyoku) as a section of the Japanese Government Railways (Ministry of Railways). The Board printed and distributed picture posters and English guidebooks overseas and encouraged development of resort hotels at home. The Board was dissolved in 1942, following the breakout of the Pacific War in 1941" (Wikipedia).


17. [MOUNT EREBUS, ANTARCTICA]
[Tinted Lithographed View of Mount Erebus after a Watercolor by Edward Adrian Wilson (1872-1912)]."Mt. Erebus April 28.11."

1913. Tinted lithograph on watermarked Whatman paper, printed image ca. 27,5x38 cm (11x15 in). A couple of creases in blank margins, otherwise a very good lithograph.
Beautiful view of Mount Erebus showing the bright colors of Aurora Australis. The original watercolor was made by Antarctic explorer and naturalist Edward Adrian Wilson while serving as head of the scientific staff of the British Antarctic (Terra Nova) Expedition, 1910-13. The watercolor was made at the expedition’s winter quarters at Cape Evans five days after the sun had disappeared for the Antarctic winter on the 23rd of April. Tender pink and reddish, "sunset-like" colors of the sky were formed by Aurora Australis which much interested the members of the expedition. Scott’s diary for the 28th of April, 1911 (when the watercolor was made) reads: "Very fine display of aurora tonight, one of the brightest I have ever seen - over Erebus; it is conceded that a red tinge is seen after the movement of light." This view was also reproduced in the first volume (p. 251) of the official account of Scott’s expedition to the South Pole, "Scott’s Last Expedition" (London, 1913, 2 vols.). The original is deposited in the Polar Art Collection of Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge.
"In 1909 Wilson readily accepted an invitation from Scott to accompany him as chief of the scientific staff. During the winters at Cape Evans on Ross Island, Wilson sketched and painted many Antarctic landscapes, the majority of which are now held in the archives of the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge. He led the winter sledging journey to Cape Crozier to collect emperor penguin embryos, and was selected by Scott for the long sledging journey to the South Pole. He died on the Ross Ice Shelf along with the other members of the party in March 1912" (Howgego. 1850-1940. Polar Regions, S14).


18. [NIGER RIVER]
ALLEN, William & PICKEN, Thomas (lithographer)
[Two Plates from the "Picturesque Views on the River Niger"]: First plate includes two panoramas: Cliffs at Attàh; Mountains and market canoes near Borwèh. Second plate shows seven strip views of the Niger with place names: Béaufort Island looking up the river; Six miles below the confluence; Twenty miles above the confluence; The Terry Mountains; The Rennel mountains; Zagoshi – Cliffs about 150 m. high – The City of Rabba.

London: John Murray, Hodgson & Graves, Ackerman, 1840. Tinted lithographs ca. 22x28,5 cm (9 x 11.5in) and 24 x 33,5 cm (9.5 x 13.5 inches). Day & Haghe, Lithrs to the Queen. Both recently matted. Plates edge worn with a couple of repaired small tears, old small ink stamp on one plate, otherwise in very good condition.
Two plates from Allen’s "Picturesque Views on the River Niger: sketched during Lander’s last visit in 1832-33" (London, 1840).
"Allen had accompanied Richard Lander and Oldfield and carried out a survey of the River Niger in 1832-1833. The present work was published in light of the interest that the proposed expedition of 1841-1842 (under the command of Captain Trotter) generated. Allen went on to command the Wilberforce on this ill-fated expedition" (Christie’s); Abbey Travel 284.


19. [NORWAY]
Environs of North Cape.

Mounted hand coloured aquatint ca. 27,5 x 37,5 cm (11 x 15 inches). Title in manuscript on the bottom margin of the mount. Card mounting slightly stained, otherwise a very good aquatint.
Beautiful hand coloured scenery of the North Cape (Norway) showing the famous cliffs with the midnight sun and sea birds in the foreground. The image was probably influenced by the aquatints of Anders Frederik Skjoldebrand from ‘Voyage pittoresque au cap Nord’ (Stockholm, 1801-1805, Abbey Travel I, 253).
"North Cape is a cape on the island of Magerøya in Northern Norway, in the municipality of Nordkapp. Its 307 metres (1,007 ft) high, steep cliff is often referred to as the northernmost point of Europe. The North Cape is the point where the Norwegian Sea, part of the Atlantic Ocean, meets the Barents Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. The midnight sun can be seen from 14 May to the 31st of July" (Wikipedia).



<

strong>20. [VICTORIA, B.C.]
[Two Lithographs Views of Victoria B.C.]: View of Victoria; A Street in Victoria.
London: Clayton & Co., 1865. Printed images ca. 11 x 18 cm (4.5 x 7 inches). Two lithographs matted in one, both lithographs in fine condition.
The two lithographs are from: Thomas Rawlings: "The Confederation of the British North American Provinces; Their Past History and Future Prospects; including also British Columbia & Hudson's Bay Territory; with a Map and Suggestions in Reference to the True and Only Practicable Route from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean" (London: Sampson, Low, Son, and Marston, 1865). The view of "A Street in Victoria" is of Wharf Street. "With the discovery of gold on the British Columbia mainland in 1855, Victoria became the port, supply base, and outfitting centre for miners on their way to the Fraser Canyon gold fields, mushrooming from a population of 300 to over 5000 literally within a few days. Victoria was incorporated as a city in 1862. In 1865, Esquimalt was made the North Pacific home of the Royal Navy, and remains Canada's west coast naval base" (Wikipedia).



21. [WILLEM BARRENTS' FIRST VOYAGE TO NOVAYA ZEMLYA]
[LE CLERC, Jean] (1675-1736)
Scheeps-tocht, in den Jaare 1596. naar Nova Zembla ondernoomen [A Voyage to Nova Zembla in 1596].

Amsterdam: Zacharias Chatelain, 1730. Double-page copper engraving on laid paper. Engraved by J. Luyken or P. Romein. Printed image ca 27 x 33,5 cm (11 x 13.5 inches). Recently matted; with some staining, minor tear and a couple of small losses in margins, but overall a good engraving.
Plate 32 from the first volume of Le Clerc’s "Geschiedenissen der vereenigde Nederlanden." The rare first Dutch edition of one of the classics on the history of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (Christie’s). Although captioned "1596." the engraving seems to relate to Willem Barents' first voyage to the Arctic Ocean and Novaya Zemlya undertaken in 1594. On the way to find the North-East Passage, Barents went along the west coast of Novaya Zemlya and discovered the Orange Islands which now comprise the northernmost part of the archipelago. "Upon discovering the Orange Islands, the crew came across a herd of approximately 200 walruses and tried to kill them with hatchets and pikes. Finding the task more difficult than they imagined, they left with only a few ivory tusks" (Wikipedia). Overall a very picturesque view with whales, polar foxes and Barent’s ship 'Mercurius' in the background.



22. ALLEN, William H.
Map of Afghanistan and the Adjacent Countries, Published By Authority of the Honourable Court of Directors of the East India Company.

London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1842. First Edition. Large folded copper engraved map, outline hand coloured ca. 66 x 80 cm (26 x 31.5 inches). Drawn and engraved by J. & C. Walker. Original publisher’s brown cloth, gilt lettered spine, gilt stamped vignette depicting armed Afghans on the front cover, blind stamped borders on both covers. Spine mildly faded, small stain on the front cover, owner’s signature on verso of the front board, otherwise a very good map.
The map shows the area from Amu Darya River and Bokhara Khanate in the north to the mouth of the Indus River in the South; from Herat, Helmand river and Sistan marches in the west to the sources of the Indus, Kashmir and Sutley river in the east.
"Allen and Co were the booksellers of the Honourable East India Company. The partnership of John and Charles Walker, prolific engravers who worked for other cartographers and for themselves flourished from 1820.., They published numerous maps of all parts of the world and were appointed engravers for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" (Tooley, Q-Z, p. 345-346).


23. AMERICAN-HAWAIIAN STEAMSHIP COMPANY
PANSING, Fred (1844-1912)
AMERICAN-HAWAIIAN STEAMSHIP COMPANY. TEHUANTEPEC ROUTE. Service Between New York, San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Puget Sound and Hawaii.

Ca. 1907. Mounted sepia toned lithograph ca 59 x 86 cm (23.5 x 34 inches). Lithograph with a couple of very minor surface scratches, otherwise in very good condition.
This attractive sepia toned lithograph is by Fred Pansing, a German-American maritime artist who specialized in oil paintings and lithographs of ocean liners, with regular commissions from Cunard and White Star Lines. The lithograph is of the Alaska which "was built in 1902 at San Francisco, California, by the Union Iron Works as the commercial cargo ship SS Alaskan for the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company, which employed her on the New York City-to-San Francisco-to-Honolulu, Hawaii, trade" (Wikipedia). The text beneath the image lists the cities served by the company and the vessels comprising its fleet.
"The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company was founded in 1899 to carry cargos of sugar from Hawaii to the United States and manufactured goods back to Hawaii. Brothers-in-law George Dearborn and Lewis Henry Lapham were the key players in the founding of the company. At the time of the company's founding, its steamships sailed around South America via the Straits of Magellan to reach the East Coast ports. By 1907, the company began using the Isthmus of Tehuantepec Route. Shipments on the Tehuantepec Route would arrive at Mexican ports – Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, for eastbound cargo, and Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz for westbound cargo - and would traverse the Isthmus of Tehuantepec on the Tehuantepec National Railway. When American political troubles with Mexico closed that route, American-Hawaiian returned to the Straits of Magellan route" (Wikipedia).



24. ANGAS, George French (1822-1886)

Portraits of the Aboriginal Inhabitants. In their Various Dances / South Australia Illustrated.
N.d., ca. 1847. Hand coloured tinted lithograph by W. Hawkins, printed image ca. 44 x 34 cm (17.5 x 13.5 inches). Margins strengthened, very minor marginal tears, overall in very good condition.
Plate 24 [Abbey notes plate 26] of Angas’ "South Australia Illustrated" (10 parts, London, 1846-47), showing Australian aborigines in dancing positions.
George French Angas was an artist and zoologist. "In 1842 Angas studied anatomical drawing and lithography in London and in September 1843 he went to South Australia, a colony of which his father was one of the founders. There he joined expeditions led by William Giles and George Grey and made sketches in watercolours of the country's Aboriginal people, scenery, and natural history. Going on to New Zealand, he travelled over 800 miles on foot in remote regions, making sketches of the country as he went. He held an exhibition in Sydney in 1845 and, after his return to England in 1846, held another in London in 1847. These two exhibitions, and the private showing of his Aboriginal costumes and artefacts and his sketches to the queen and prince consort, helped him raise subscriptions for the publication of Savage Life in Australia and New Zealand (2 vols., 1847), South Australia Illustrated (1849), and The New Zealanders Illustrated (1849) <..,> His sympathy with the people he met on his travels and his enjoyment of unfamiliar scenery are evident from his paintings, which have been admired and collected, particularly in Australia" (Oxford DNB); Abbey Travel 577; Colas 133; Ferguson 4458; Tooley (1954) 62-3.



25. ANSON, George (1697-1762)
A Chart of the Pacific Ocean from the Equinoctial to the Latitude of 39 1/2d. No.

[London]: [John and Paul Knapton], [1748]. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 27.5 x 88 cm. (10.5 x 34.5 inches). Engraved by R.W. Seale. With original folds, some mild age toning, otherwise a very good map.
"Unusual chart on two joined sheets detailing the route of Spanish galleons between the Philippines and Acapulco. The tracks of British Navy Commodore George Anson and Spanish Nostra Seigniora de Cabadonga are shown. Engraved by R. W. Seale. In 1740 Anson set sail in command of a squadron sent to attack Spanish possessions and interests in South America. The expedition was ill-equipped and failed to carry out its original ambitious mission. By June 1741 when Anson reached Juan Fernandes, his force had been reduced to only three of the original six ships, while the strength of his crews had fallen from 961 to 335. After recuperating on the island, he collected the remaining survivors on his flagship, the Centurion, and set sail in search of one of the richly laden galleons that conducted the trade between Mexico and the Philippines. The indomitable perseverance he had shown during one of the most arduous voyages the history of sea adventure gained the reward of the capture of an immensely rich prize, the Nuestra Senora de Cabadonga, which he encountered off Cape Espiritu Santo on June 20, 1743" (Old World Auctions).



26. ATKINSON, James (1780-1852)
The City of Candahar.

London: H. Graves & Co., 1842. Sepia tinted lithograph heightened in white ca. 25 x 37 cm (10 x 14.5 inches). A very mild water stain on lower left corner, not affecting image, otherwise a very good lithograph.
A distant prospect of Kandahār or Qandahār, now the second largest city in Afghanistan located in the south of the country; troops and tents and locals supplying food provisions to foreground. Besieging Anglo-Indian forces took Kandahar on April 25, 1839, on their way to Kabul.
The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842.
From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson of the East India Company’s Bengal Medical Service. Lithography by Louis and Charles Haghe. Atkinson's "Expedition into Affghanistan provides an interesting personal narrative, supplemented by his Sketches in Affghanistan (1842) containing a series of lithographed drawings which complete the picture of what was then an unexplored country. He also had a talent for portraiture, several of his works, including a self-portrait, are in the National Portrait Gallery" (Oxford DNB); Abbey Travel 508, #15.



27. BARNIM, Freiherrn Adalbert von (1841-1860)
[Tinted Lithograph] Felsentempel bei Abu-Simbil. Temples de Abou-Simbil. Rock-Temple of Aboo-Simbel.

[Berlin]: [Reimer], [1863]. Tinted lithograph after original sketches by Freiherrn Adalbert von Barnim and drawn by Bellermann, printed image ca. 30 x 39 cm (12 x 15.5 inches). A very good wide margined tinted lithograph. Edges with minor tears not affecting printed surface.
From the rare work "Reise des Freiherrn Adalbert von Barnim durch Nord-Ost-Afrika in den Jahren 1859 und 1860." Aldalbert, Baron von Barnim and his doctor, Hartmann, travelled through Egypt, the Sudan and Nubia, although Barnim died, aged nineteen, on the return journey. "The party ascended the Nile into the Sudan, explored from Old Dongola to Khartoum, then proceeded up the Blue Nile as far as Fazogli on the border of Ethiopia. Von Barnim died during the expedition on 12.7.[18]60 at Roseres but Hartmann returned to Germany and in 1863 published an account of the expedition" (Howgego, Continental Exploration 1850-1940, B17).



28. BAXTER, George (1804-1867)
[Arctic Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin].

London: George Baxter, [1850]. Baxter print, printed image ca. 15 x 19 cm (6 x 7.5 inches). Trimmed to image, with added tinsel ribbon fringe; recently matted. A very good print.
Baxter print. "Arctic Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin" CL No 342 dated 1850. The print shows the Sir John Ross's expedition in May 1849; the Enterprise and Investigator seen in the background. The image (part) can also be found on Pot Lid 17 (Ball- The Price Guide to Pot Lids). No lettering on the plate, and being a Stamped Mount it has a gold border to the picture.
"George Baxter is regarded as the 'inventor' of color printing, which brought him international fame. His technique was innovative, combining an engraved metal plate with as many as twenty engraved wooden blocks, each printed in a separate color <..,> For the next twenty-five years Baxter dominated color printing, branching out into a variety of publishing areas, including decorated music sheets, notepaper, pocket-books, and his famous needle cases <..,> Baxter's subjects were remarkably varied and included sentimental treatments of religious and romantic themes, prints of typical London figures, and newsworthy events" (Oxford DNB).



29. BAXTER, George (1804-1867)
The Reception of the Rev. J. Williams, at Tanna, in the South Seas, the Day Before He Was Massacred.

London: George Baxter, 1841. Baxter print, printed image ca. 32,5 x 22 cm (13 x 8.5 inches). Trimmed to image; very small chip to blank bottom right; but overall a very good print. In a recent mat.
One of George Baxter’s famous 'missionary' prints depicting the ill-fated missionary, John Williams (1796-1839), who was killed by the natives of the Eromanga Island (New Hebrides) while on a missionary voyage there, in November 1830. "Through his violent death, at the peak of his missionary career, so soon after his successful visit to England, Williams became a heroic figure among English nonconformists and the subject of a huge popular literature. The Revd Dr John Campbell of Moorfields Tabernacle reflected that ‘for the purposes of history, he died in the proper manner, at the proper place, and at the proper time’ (Campbell, 228). Baxter's prints of Williams and his martyrdom at Eromanga only added to his reputation. Williams was indeed a ‘remarkable all-round missionary’ (Garrett, 86) and a chief-like figure, but his image was greater than his actual achievements. From 1844 until 1971 a succession of LMS ships in the Pacific were named after him" (Oxford DNB).
George Baxter is regarded as the 'inventor' of color printing, which brought him international fame. His technique was innovative, combining an engraved metal plate with as many as twenty engraved wooden blocks, each printed in a separate color <..,> For the next twenty-five years Baxter dominated color printing, branching out into a variety of publishing areas, including decorated music sheets, notepaper, pocket-books, and his famous needle cases <..,> Baxter's subjects were remarkably varied and included sentimental treatments of religious and romantic themes, prints of typical London figures, and newsworthy events. His piety led him to produce some of his most powerful work for the immensely influential and prosperous missionary societies. In collaboration with John Snow, Baxter worked for the London Missionary Society from 1837 to 1843, and in 1844-5 with the Baptist and Wesleyan missionary societies. His most celebrated missionary print was The Massacre of the Lamented Missionary, the Rev. J. Williams and Mr. Harris at Erromanga (1841).



30. BENTLEY, Charles & SCHOMBURGK, Robert Hermann (1804-1865)
Pirara and Lake Amucu. The Site of El Dorado.

London: Ackermann & Co., 1840. Hand coloured tinted lithograph by George Barnardo, printed image ca. 28,5 x 40,5 cm (16 x 11.5 inches). Lithograph in very good condition.
Plate 4 from Bentley’s "Twelve Views in the Interior of Guiana" (London, 1841), describing Robert Hermann Schomburgk’s expedition to British Guiana in 1835-39. The plate shows the Amacu Lake in southern Guyana, which Rupupuni River flows into. It was supposed by Alexander von Humboldt that Amacu was the legendary Lake Parime of Walter Ralegh, a site of El Dorado, which had been unsuccessfully searched for since the end of the 16th century. Schomburgk visited the lake and supported Humboldt's supposition.
"During 1835-9, under the direction of the Royal Geographical Society, Schomburgk explored the rivers Essequibo (the sources of which he was the first European to reach), Corentyn, and Berbice, and investigated in detail the capabilities of the colony of British Guiana. In 1837 he discovered and sent to England the giant water lily Victoria regia now renamed Victoria amazonica. By his journey across the interior from the Essequibo to Esmeralda on the Orinoco he was enabled to connect his observations with those of his countryman, Humboldt, and to determine astronomically a series of fixed points extending across the watershed of the great rivers of equatorial America. For these services the Royal Geographical Society conferred on him in 1840 one of its gold medals.
On his return to Europe, Schomburgk represented to the British government the necessity of settling the actual boundary of British Guiana, for commercial and humanitarian reasons. In April 1840 he was appointed a commissioner for surveying and marking out the boundaries of the colony, and before returning to South America he wrote A Description of British Guiana, Geographical and Statistical (1840), which was in its original form a report to the Colonial Office and is the first detailed account of the colony. For more popular consumption he published by subscription Twelve Views in the Interior of Guiana (1841)" (Oxford DNB). He later proposed a border line between British Guiana and Venezuela, known as the 'Schomburgk Line.' Abbey Travel 720; Sabin 77796; Tooley (1954) 447.



31. BERGHAUS, Hermann (1828-1890) & STÜLPNAGEL, Fr. von
Chart of the World on Mercators Projection.

Gotha: Justus Perthes, 1863. First edition [?]. Large folding colour lithograph map, ca. 91,5x149,5 cm (36x59 inches), linen backed, with the red cloth edges. Engraved by Eberhardt and by Will. Weiler. The linen backing with minor mild foxing, otherwise a very good map.
Apparently first edition of this famous map of the world which went through at least 11 editions. It shows over 50 routes of the main ocean steam navigation companies, as well as lines of steam packet communications, telegraph lines and tracks of sailing vessels. The map includes ocean depths and currents, borders of the sea pack ice and sea weed (Sargasso) et al. There are also five additional inset maps: ‘The Nicaragua Route' (with two small maps of the Isthmuses of Panama and Tehuantepec); ‘Lower Egypt’ (showing the railroads and Suez Canal); ‘Lines of Equal Magnetic Declination’; ‘The World on Polar Projection’ (with steam navigation and telegraph lines); and a "General Wind Chart."
"Hermann Berghaus was a German cartographer; during most of his life he worked in the Geographical Institute of Justus Perthes at Gotha. His best known work is a chart of the world (1863). He also prepared a Physikalische Wandkarte von Afrika (Physical wall map of Africa, 1881). Besides this, he supervised the revision of his famous uncle's Physikalischer Atlas (1886), which project was participated in by many noted specialists" (Wikipedia).


32. BERNATZ, John Martin (1802-1878)
Mount Shamsham of Cape Aden.

London: Bradbury and Evans, 1852. Tinted lithograph, printed image ca. 26x34,5 cm (10.5 x 14 inches). Lithographed by L. Rottmann. Some foxing, mostly marginal, otherwise a very good lithograph.
Plate I. from "Scenes in Ethiopia. Designed from Nature. By John Martin Bernatz, Artist to the British Mission to the Court of Shoa" (2 vols., London, 1852). "The artist John Martin Bernatz, best known for the fine series of lithographs published in his Palestina (1868), was official artist to the embassy of Major William Cornwallis Harris sent in 1841 to open up trade with the ancient kingdom of Shoa" (Sotheby’s).
"The German-born artist Johann (or John) Bernatz accompanied Major William Cornwallis Harris as official artist on his mission to open up trading links with the ancient Ethiopian kingdom of Shoa. The present work is probably the most important published work to result from the expedition. A number of Bernatz's images were reproduced in Harris's Illustrations of the Highlands of Aethiopia (London, 1844), but he is now probably best known for the fine series of lithographs published in his Palestina, published in 1868. The present series was republished in Germany in 1854 or 1855 as Bilder aus Aethiopien" (Christie’s); Not in Abbey; Brunet I,798 (incorrect plate count, 'bel ouvrage').



33. BOLTON, S.
Africa, Performed by the Sr. D'Anville under the Patronage of the Duke of Orleans.

London, [1755]. Outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca.100 x 97cm (39 x 38 inches). Original folds, otherwise map in very good condition.
Very large map made from four sheets joined together into one, and with an inset of the Azores. This map is from Postlethwayt's "The Universal Dictionary of Trade and Commerce." This map shows the Mountains of the Moon as the source of the Nile. Tooley Africa p.6; Tooley's Mapmakers A-D, p.160.


34. BOUTTATS, Frederik (ca. 1620-?), engraver
[PORTRAIT of HONDIUS, Henrick the Elder (1573-1650)] Henricus Hondius. Engraveur, et tres bon Deseyniateur Natif de Duffel en Brabant l'an 1573 de Nobel Origine il at apris a deseyneier chez Ieronimus Wierix , il excercoit ausi en Orpherie, mais il fut tout iour plus incline a la gravure il at ausi apris la Mathematique, la Geo:metrie, Perspective, Architecture, et Fortification chez le Vieux Iean Vredeman Vrise, et aupres Samuel Marelois homme sans pareil, ou il a tout bien experimentez monstrant per les eures, q'on voit de luy en estampes, maintenant il demeure en la Haye. Henricus Hondius delineavit. Fredericus Bouttats fecit. Ioan Meyssens excud.

[Antwerp], ca. 1662. Copper engraving ca. 16,5 x 11 cm (6.5 x 4.5 inches). Paper age toned, otherwise a very good engraving.
Famous engraved portrait published in Cornelis de Bie's "Het Gulden Cabinet vande Edel Vry Schilder-Const" (Antwerp, 1661-1662, 3 vols). Hondius is shown with a pair of compasses and an abstract Dutch landscape in the window behind his back.
"Henrik Hondius I or Hendrik Hondius the Elder was a Dutch Golden Age engraver, cartographer and publisher. He is known as a draftsman, engraver and publisher of maps, landscapes, genre scenes, portraits, architectural views "Les cinq rangs d'Architecture, 1617" and technical drawings "Geometrie, contenant La Theorie et Practique - a La Fortification, 1616". With Hans Vredeman de Vries he published a textbook on perspective in 1604-05" (Wikipedia).



35. BRAUN, Georg (1541-1622) & HOGENBERG, Frans (1535-1590)
Cairus, quae olim Babylon; Aegypt Maxima Urbs [Cairo, the biggest city in Babylon & Egypt].

Cologne, 1572. Large birds-eye plan with original full hand colouring ca. 33.5 x 49 cm (13 x 19.5 inches). A good impression, the plan is in very good condition.
"Georg Braun was a topo-geographer. From 1572 to 1617 he edited the Civitates orbis terrarum, which contains 546 prospects, bird's-eye views and maps of cities from all around the world" (Wikipedia)
"This striking bird's-eye view of Cairo and the surrounding countryside [from Civitates orbis terrarum] includes depictions of the pyramids and the Sphinx. Several people are illustrated in the foreground including a cavalry engaged in exercises, travelers on the roads, veiled women and a man picking dates. Boats and crocodiles fill the Nile River. A legend describing the view is enclosed in a strapwork cartouche at bottom right. The text above the view of the pyramids reflects the disdain with which the non-Christian nations were viewed at the time. "These pyramids were nothing but an idle display of royal wealth. In this way the kings, or rather the crowned beasts, namely hoped to make their names immortal on earth and to keep their memory alive for a long time. Nothing in the world is of less fame, however, since neither the architect nor the insane king who built a pyramid is recorded." This is one of the few views of cities outside of Europe that were included in the Civitates. Latin text on verso" (Old World Auctions). Civitates orbis terrarum is "the first atlas of town plans and views embracing the known world" (Tooley A-D, p.185).


36. BRAUN, Georg (1541-1622) & HOGENBERG, Franz (1535-1590)
Goa Fortissima Indiae Urbs in Christianorum Potestatem Anno Salutis 1509 Devenit [on sheet with] Diu.

[Cologne], [1572]. Two copper engraved hand coloured views on one leaf ca. 23,5 x 47 cm (9.5 x 18.5 inches). Latin text on verso. Original centre fold, age toned, minor stains, otherwise a very good engraving.
A plate from the first volume of the renowned "Civitates Orbis Terrarium" (Köln, 1572-1617, 6 vols.). The view of Diu shows the city behind the rampart with moorages and boats in the foreground.
Large panoramic view of Goa – one of the first printed views of the city – shows the "Portuguese naval attack on Goa (1510), led by Alfonso De Albuquerque (1453-1515), which ended in the capture of the city from the Muslims. It began 450 years of Portuguese rule that left a distinct cultural legacy in Goa, in terms of religion, language, architecture and cuisine. Goa became the capital of Portugal's eastern empire, which included trading fairs called "feitoras" and forts in Eastern Africa, India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan" (Royal Museums Greenwich on-line).
"The Civitates Orbis Terrarum is justly celebrated as the first general collection devoted solely to topographical views. Many of the towns depicted are the first engraved views. Apart from its topographical value, the work is of great interest for its record of the domestic life of the period. Town views, heraldic coats of arms, rural scenes, land and water transport, public buildings and so on are vividly depicted (NMM). 'The most original and magnificent of all city-atlases', which drew 'on the work of accomplished topographical artists; and... Reproduced it in pictorial compositions of great charm and individuality' (Skelton, p.VII/ G. Braun and F. Hogenberg, Civitates orbis terrarium, Amsterdam, 1965)" (Christie’s).



37. BROMLEY, John Charles (1795-1839), engraver
Lt. Coll. Denham FRS late Lt. Governor of Sierra Leone. From a picture painted on his return from Bornou in Central Africa in 1825 by Thos. Phillips Esq. RA in the possession of John Murray Esqr.

London: Dominic Colnaghi & Co., 1831. Mezzotint, printed image ca. 28,5x17,5 cm (11.5 x 7 inches). Mildly age toned, with minor edge wear, otherwise a very good wide margined mezzotint.
Excellent mezzotint portrait of the famous African explorer Dixon Denham (1786-1828), after the portrait by Thomas Phillips (1826).
"In 1822 Denham was diverted to a British government expedition to establish trade links with the West African states, intending to join Dr Walter Oudney and Lt. Hugh Clapperton, at Murzuk, in Fezzan, where they had been stranded since early in the year. Denham reached Murzuk in November 1822, finding his two compatriots in a wretched condition, Clapperton ill of an ague, and Oudney with a severe cold. Nevertheless, the expedition started on the 29th November, and made its way due south across the Sahara reaching Kuka in the Bornu Empire, (now Kokawa, Nigeria) on 17 February 1823. It was from Kuka that Denham, against the wish of Oudney and Clapperton, accompanied a slave-raiding expedition into the Mandara Mountains south of Bornu. The raiders were defeated, and Denham barely escaped with his life. By this time, a deep antipathy had developed between Clapperton and Denham <..,>
When Oudney and Clapperton set out for the Hausa states in December 1823, Denham remained behind to explore the western, south and south-eastern shores of Lake Chad, and the lower courses of the rivers Waube, Logone and Shari, proving beyond doubt that Lake Chad was not the source of the Niger, as had been widely believed. During this time Oudney died, and Clapperton returned to Kuka barely recognizable after his privations. In August 1824, Denham left Kuka alone for the return journey to Tripoli and England; Clapperton followed in January 1825. In June 1826 Denham was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.
In December 1826 Denham, promoted lieutenant-colonel, sailed for Sierra Leone as superintendent of liberated Africans. In 1828 he was appointed governor of Sierra Leone, but after administering the colony for five weeks died of fever at Freetown" (Wikipedia).
"John Charles Bromley was the son of prominent engraver William Bromley. He was the first of William Bromley's sons to achieve reputation as an engraver, engraving plates for River Scenery after Turner and Girtin in 1826 and exhibiting at the Royal Academy in 1827 and 1829. In 1830, he engraved The Trial of Lord William Russell after Sir George Hayter, and in 1837, he published his mezzotint of Haydon's The Reform Banquet" (National Portrait Gallery on-line).



38. BULYCHOV, Ivan Demianovich (1813-1877)
[Kamchatka] Two Chromolithographed plates from "Puteshestvie po Vostochnoi Sibiri. Ch. 1. Iakutskaia Oblast, Okhotskii krai" [Travel Across Eastern Siberia. Part 1. Travel to Kamchatka].
Plate [1]: "Vnutrennost’ Iurty Sidiachikh Koriak = Intérieur d'une yourte des koriaks sédentaires" [Interior of a Jurt of Sedentary Koriaks].
Plate [2]: "1. Brodiachy Tungus. 2. Olenny Tungus. Starshina = 1. Toungousse errant. 2. Toungousse nomade. Chef d'une tribu" [1. Errant Tungus. 2. Nomadic Tungus. Tribal Chief].

Saint Petersburg & Moscow: A. Klusel & Draeger and C°, 1856. Chromolithographs ca. 33,5 x 30 cm (13.5 x11.5 ) each. Titles in Russian and French. Margins slightly soiled and with a few minor tears, otherwise very good wide margined chromolithographs.
Plates from a very rare chromolithographed atlas with only seven copies found in Worldcat.
The author, Russian statesman Ivan Bulychov, went to Siberia in 1844-45 as a member of a large State Inspection Commission which went to audit the finances and administration of the Eastern Siberia. The inspection revealed incredible abuses of power by local authorities and a vast use of state funds for private purposes. As a result of the travel Bulychov wrote a book "Puteshestvie po Vostochnoi Sibiri" of which only Part 1, dedicated to the Yakutsk and Okhotsk regions, was published (SPB., 1856). It was accompanied by a beautiful chromolithographed atlas, containing 64 plates and issued in 21 parts in printed wrappers. The atlas included views of Eastern Siberia and Kamchatka, the Lena River, Okhotsky tract, cities of Irkutsk, Yakutsk, Olekminsk, Petropavlovsk, as well as types of local Buriats, Yakuts, Koriaks, Kamchadals, like in our case.
Although the name of the artist wasn’t specified anywhere in the Atlas, he is known. It was a Polish lawyer Leopold Nemirovsky (1810-1883), who for his participation in the Polish-Russian war of 1830-31 was sentenced to death by the Russian government, but the verdict was replaced by exile to Siberian penal servitude for 20 years. In 1839 Nemirovsky arrived in Irkutsk and initially worked at a state salt factory. But being quite quickly noted as a talented artist, he was gradually released of penal servitude and worked as a drawing teacher to the children of the local elite. He accompanied Bulychov’s expedition to North-Eastern Siberia and Kamchatka as a "government" artist, where his outstanding drawings of local landscapes and life were executed. In 1847 Nemirovski was allowed to come back to European Russia, and in 1856 to return to Poland. Nemirovsky’s works are quite rare as a large number of them were destroyed when his house was burnt down in 1877. The originals of the lithographs of Bulychov’s albums are now in the National Museum in Warsaw.


39. COMMELIN, Isaac (1598-1676)
[Map of Madagascar] Insula de S. Lauretij.

Amsterdam, 1646. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 14.5 x 22 cm. (5.5 x 8.5 inches). A very good map.
"A very uncommon map of Madagascar published in Commelin's famous collections of travels to illustrate the earliest voyage of the Dutch to the East Indies in 1595. The corners of the map are filled with four detailed insets of the important bays showing the navigational hazards and Insula de S. Maria. Place names are from the earliest Portuguese explorers. The map is richly embellished with two compass roses, a sailing ship and strapwork cartouches enclosing the insets" (Old World Auctions). Commelin's work "Begin ende voortgangh, van de Vereenighde Nederlantsche Geoctroyeerde Oost-Indische Compagnie" included 230 maps and plates. "This extensively illustrated collection of more than twenty voyages to the East and West Indies constitutes one of the most valuable records of Dutch exploration" (Christies). Tooley's Mapmakers A-D, p.291.



40. CONCANEN, Alfred
Stannard & Son’s Birds-Eye View of Afghanistan and Central Asia, Showing the Positions of the Russian and Afghans Advanced Posts, Compiled From the Latest Reliable Sources Under the Direction of the Publishers by Alfred Concanen.

London: Stannard & Son, 1885. First Edition. Large folding tinted lithographed map ca. 55 x 76 cm (22 x 30 inches). Original publisher’s gray printed (orange) wrappers, separate from map. A near fine map.
Very rare map with only one copy found in Worldcat. This attractive bird's eye view map shows the region from the Aral Sea, Syr Darya River and Tashkent in the north to the Arabian Sea and the mouth of the Indus in the south; from the Caspian Sea and Tehran in the west to Simla and Ladakh in the east. "Showing the Positions of the Russian and Afghans' Advanced Posts." There is also a smaller outline sketch of the region in the bottom right corner of the map, showing wider borders: Deccan and Arabian Peninsulas, parts of Africa, the Mediterranean and Turkey. State borders outlined in black, "Disputed territories" between Russian Turkestan and Afghanistan outlined in pink.


41. COOK, Captain James (1728-1779)
Chart of the NW Coast of America and the NE Coast of Asia Explored in the Years 1778 & 1779. The Unshaded Parts of the Coast of Asia are Taken from a M.S. Chart Received from the Russians.

London: T. Harmar, 1784. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 67 x 39 cm (26.5 x 15.5 inches). Copper engraved double-page map by T. Harmar on laid paper with original centrefold. A fine wide-margined map.
Plate 36 from the atlas of Cook's third voyage "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean, Undertaken... For the Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere in 1776, 77, 78, 79 and 1780" (London, 1784; 3 vols. And atlas) shows Cook's discoveries in the North Pacific. It was Cook who for the first time "accurately depicted the Northwest coast of America" (Oxford DNB).
"The north-west coast of North America was sighted on 7 March and for the next six and a half months Cook carried out a running survey of some 4000 miles of its coast from Cape Blanco on the coast of Oregon to Icy Cape on the north coast of Alaska, where he was forced to turn back by an impenetrable wall of ice. A search for a route back to Europe north of Siberia also proved fruitless. During this cruise Cook became the first European to enter Nootka Sound on the north-west coast of Vancouver Island, where he remained for a month taking astronomical observations and cutting spars for use as spare masts and yardarms. Trade was carried out with the native Mowachaht for furs, mostly of the sea otter, which when sold later in China drew attention to the commercial potential of this trade" (Oxford DNB); Wagner 696; Lada-Mocarski 37; Sabin 16250.



42. CORONELLI, [Vincenzo] (1650-1718)
Archipelague du Mexique, ou Sont les Isles de Cuba, Espagnole, I'Amerique, etc. Avec les Isles Lucayes, et les Isles Caribes, Connues sous le Nom d'Antilles [Mexico, the islands of Cuba, Spanish Ameriqa, etc.. With the Bahamas and the Caribbean Islands Known as the West Indies].

Paris: J.B. Nolin, 1688. A large outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 45 x 60 cm. (17.5 x 23.5 inches) A good impression with full wide margins. Verso with old paper repair, blank upper margin with a minor stain, otherwise the map is in very good condition.
Rare first issue. "This splendid and uncommon map covers all the West Indies, including the Bahamas and the southern tip of Florida. The partnership of Coronelli and Nolin produced some of the best regional maps of the Americas of the period. The map provides an excellent view of the islands, banks and shoals. The large decorative title cartouche incorporates an extensive key. It is surrounded with fruits, natives, and animals of the islands, including a sea turtle and a flying fish. An elegantly wrought passionflower vine surrounds the explanation at top, while ginger and indigo adorn the scale of miles at bottom" (Old World Auctions). "Vincenzo Coronelli was a Franciscan monk, cosmographer, cartographer, publisher, and encyclopedist known in particular for his atlases and globes. He spent most of his life in Venice" (Wikipedia); Tooley A-D, p301-3.


43. CORONELLI, Vincenzo Maria (1650-1718)
Canada Orientale nell'America Settentrionale Descritta dal P. Mro. Coronelli M C Cosmografo della Seren Republica di Venetia.., [Map Showing Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Parts of Quebec].

Venice, ca. 1695. First Edition. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 46 x 61 cm (18 x 24 inches). The map is a very strong impression in very good condition.
"This handsome map is based on Nolin's Partie Orientale du Canada ou de la Nouvelle France, but is focused on Newfoundland and the mouth of the St. Lawrence, showing Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, Isle de Anticosti and Prince Edward Island. Coronelli has taken the relevant area from Nolin's map and transcribed it with a magnificent, aquatic cartouche. There is particular interest paid to the Grand Bank and other fishing banks of the region, mapping them as carefully as the coastline. There are some notations on the map by Coronelli referring to the quantity and varieties of fish to be found in the waters. Kershaw notes that this map is of considerable importance to a collector as a derivative of Nolin's map" (Old World Auctions); Kershaw 162.


44. CORRY, J[oseph]
The Colony of Sierra Leone, A Bearing S.E. By E. Distant 3 Miles, and the Bananas, Bearing N.W. By W. Distant 2 Leagues.

London: G. & W. Nicol, Aug. 1, 1807. Hand coloured aquatint drawn by R Cocking from a sketch by J. Corry and engraved by I. C. Stadler. Printed image ca. 20 x 45 cm (8 x 17.5 inches) Margins with chips but not affecting the printed surface, otherwise a good aquatint.
Plate #3 from Joseph Corry's "Observations upon the Windward Coast of Africa, the religion, character, customs, &c. of the natives; with a system upon which they may be civilized, and a system upon which they may be civilized, and a knowledge attained of the interior of this extraordinary quarter of the globe; and upon the natural and commercial resources of the country made in the years 1805 and 1806... With an appendix containing a letter to Lord Howick, on the most simple and effectual means of abolishing the slave trade" (London: W. Bulmer & Co. for G. & W. Nicol and James Asperne, 1807). Abbey Travel 278.



45. CRESSWELL, Samuel Gurney (1827-1867)
Sledging over Hummocky Ice. April, 1853.

London: Day & Son, 1854. Chromolithograph, printed image ca. 34x43 cm (13.5 x17 inches). Chromolithograph by W. Simpson, mounted on old cardboard and matted, cut close to the image, but with no loss. A good chromolithograph.
Plate VIII from Cresswell’s "A Series of Eight Sketches in Colour of the Voyage of H.M.S. Investigator" (London, 1854), rare set of spectacular lithographed views of Captain Robert McClure’s expedition to the Northwest Passage in 1850-54. McClure "was given command of the Investigator as part of the second Franklin search expedition. Entering the North-West Passage from the Bering Strait and sailing eastwards, the ship became trapped in pack ice in the autumn of 1851, before being finally abandoned in 1853" (Christie’s).
Cresswell was a second Lieutenant on the Investigator and led several sledge investigating and rescue parties across Banks and Dealy Islands after the ship had been stuck in the ice. "He is best remembered as the artist of the cruise. His paintings of the ship in the grip of ice and almost flung over on her side, and of his Dealy island party, painfully dragging a loaded sledge up a ramp of ice-rubble, do more than the liveliest prose to bring home to us what was endured by the stalwarts of the British Navy in the mapping of Canada’s northern archipelago with wind-jammers and man-hauled sledges" (Neatby, L.H. Samuel Gurney Cresswell (1827-1867) / Arctic, v. 35, no. 4, Dec. 1982, p. 554-555, ill.); Abbey Travel 644, Sabin 17490; Staton & Tremaine 3353.



46. DE BRY, Johann Theodor de (1561-1623)
[Pigafetta Map of the Congo] Tabula Geogra: Regni Congo.

Frankfurt: Theodore De Bry, [1597]. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 31 x 38 cm (12 x 15 inches) A nice strong impression. A couple of minor marginal tears, otherwise a very good map.
"Boldly engraved map of the Congo region of the West African coast from just south of the equator to present-day Angola with a highly conjectural Congo river system. Dramatic topography and imaginary cities are depicted and the map is adorned by an elaborate title cartouche and a compass rose. The map accompanied a description by Pigafetta of Eduardo Lopez's visit to the region in 1578. From: Petit Voyages, Part I" (Old World Auctions). "Duarte Lopez was a Portuguese trader to Congo and Angola who wrote one of the earliest descriptions of Central Africa. Lopez first left Portugal for the Congo in April 1578, sailing on his uncle's trading vessel.., Lopez was able to relate everything he knew about the Congo to Filippo Pigafetta, who had been charged with collecting information about the region. The result was published by Pigafetta in 1591, although much of what it contained bordered on the fabulous. Lopez returned to the Congo in 1589, after which nothing more is heard of him" (Howgego L146).


47. DIXON, George (1748?-1795)
[NORTHWEST COAST OF AMERICA] To the Right Honorable the Lords Commissioners ... This Chart of the North West Coast of America, with the Tracks of the King George and Queen Charlotte in 1786 & 1787...

London: W. Harrison & J. Reid, 24 December 1788. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 88,5 x 58 cm (34.5x 23 inches). Copper engraved chart on laid paper with original centrefold. Backed, with a few tears and chips repaired and backing extending the lower margin, otherwise in very good condition.
Large chart of the West coast of North America from Nootka Sound to the Alaska Peninsula, from Dixon’s "A Voyage Round the World; but more Particularly to the North-West Coast of America" (London, 1789). "In 1785-87 [Dixon] sailed with Nathaniel Portlock for the King George’s Sound Company, which had been established <..,> for trading furs from the northwest coast of America to China. With the ships King George (under Portlock) and Queen Charlotte (under Dixon) they <..,> arrived on the Alaskan coast in July 1786. After wintering in the Sandwich Islands (winter 1786-87), the two captains returned to northern waters, visiting the Cook Inlet, Prince William Sound, the Alaskan mainland and the Queen Charlotte Islands. Dixon disposed of his cargo and returned to England in 1788, the following year publishing his popular Voyage Round the World. The bulk of the book consists of descriptive letters by William Beresford, his supercargo, but it contains valuable charts and appendices by Dixon himself. Dixon is generally credited with the discovery of the Queen Charlotte Islands (which were named after his ship), as well as Port Mulgrave, Norfolk Bay, Dixon’s Archipelago the Dixon Entrance, and several other features also bearing the name of his ship" (Howgego, to 1800, D58); Wagner 732; Lada-Mocarski 43.


48. DOUDART DE LAGREE, Ernest (1823-1868) & DELAPORTE, Louis, artist (1842-1925)
Cambodge. Colonnade de l‘entrée ouest et vue générale d’Angcor-Wat [Colonnade of the West Entrance and a General View of Angkor Wat, Cambodia].

Paris: Librairie Hachette & Cie, 1873. Sepia lithograph, printed image ca. 25 x 63,5 cm (10 x 25.5 inches). Benoist & Eug. Ciceri lith., imp. Lemercier & Cie. Slightly age-toned, original centre fold and with a minor repaired tear on the lower margin, not affecting image, otherwise a very good lithograph.
One of the main plates from the second part of "Atlas du voyage d’exploration en Indo-Chine, effectué pendant les années 1866, 1867 et 1868" (Paris, 1873) represents a stunning panorama of the Angkor Wat. It was taken during the French Mekong Expedition 1866-68 under command of Ernest Doudart de Lagrée and Francis Garnier. The expedition surveyed the possibility of steamship navigation on Mekong and ascended the river from its mouth to Yunnan thus becoming the first systematic European exploration of the Mekong. Cordier Sinica 329; Cordier Indosinica 1012.
"Louis Delaporte was a French explorer and artist, whose collection and documentation of Khmer art formed the nucleus of exhibitions in Paris, originally at the 1878 Paris Exposition and later at the Palais du Trocadéro, where he became chief curator of the Musée Indochinois. He participated in the French Mekong Expedition and later recalled his impressions of Angkor Wat:
"The sight of these strange ruins struck me, too, with a keen astonishment, I admired the bold and grandiose design of these monuments no less than the perfect harmony of all their parts. Khmer art, issuing from the mixture of India and China, purified, ennobled by artists whom one might call the Athenians of the Far East, has remained the most beautiful expression of human genius in this vast part of Asia that extends from the Indus to the Pacific" (Wikipedia).


49. DUDLEY, Sir Robert (1574-1649)
[First Map of the Labrador Sea Between Greenland and Labrador] Carta particolare della Meta Incognita Australe con una parte della America Settentrionale..,

Florence, [1661]. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 45.5 x 37 cm (18 x 14.5 inches). A good strong impression. Middle of right margin with a small chip, not affecting the printed area, otherwise a very good map.
This is the second state of this map, which "is the first printed sea chart to depict the waters between Greenland, labelled Europa on the map, and Labrador. Using Mercator's projection for the first time, it is also the earliest to indicate the prevailing winds and ocean currents" (Burden 275).
"In the early 1640s [Dudley] retired to the Villa di Castello and devoted himself to writing on naval matters, drawing on his experience to compose the encyclopaedic Dell'arcano del mare (1646-7), dedicated to Grand Duke Ferdinand II. The first of its six books dealt with methods of calculating longitude, including those of his own invention; the second contained charts and sailing directions. The third contained much of the material in the earlier ‘Direttorio marittimo’, plus proposals for the creation of a navy; the fourth book, concerned with shipbuilding and fortifications, recalled his practical experience at Leghorn. Book five built on the work of the Portuguese navigator Pedro Nunez. The final book was an atlas of 127 maps, the first to employ Mercator's projections" (Oxford DNB); Tooley A-D, p.395


50. DUPERREY, Louis-Isidore (1786-1865)
[French Polynesia] Carte des îles de la Société, Dressée d’apres les observations faites dans les trois voyages de Cook et dans l’expedition de la Corvette de S.M. La Coquille [Map of the Society Islands Drawn after the Observations made During Three Voyages of Cook and the Expedition of His Majesty Corvette Coquille].

[Paris], 1826. Copper engraved map ca. 47x74 cm (18.5 x 29.5 inches). Ecrit par Hacq, Gravé par Ambroise Tardieu. With original centre fold, mild foxing, otherwise a very good map.
Map # 8 from the grand edition of Duperrey’s travel to the Pacific "Voyage autour du Monde, execute per ordre du Roi, sur la Corvette La Coquille de sa Majeste, pendant les années 1822, 1823, 1824 et 1825" (Paris: A. Berthrand, 1825-30; 6 vols. Text and 4 vols. Atlases, the edition was not completed).
The map shows the Society Islands (Tahiti, Moorea, Huahine, Bora Bora, Maupiti and Tupai) and the tracks of the main European expeditions which visited the islands: the expeditions under the command of Wallis (1767) and Bougainville (1768), three voyages of James Cook (1769-1777), and the track of Duperrey’s expedition which stayed in the archipelago between May and June 1823.
"One of the major French Pacific voyages of the nineteenth century. <..,> The Coquille called at Brazil, the Falkland islands, Concepcion, Callao, and Payta. The Pacific islands visited were the Tuamotu Archipelago, Tahiti and the Society Islands, Tonga, Rotuma, the Gilbert and Caroline Islands, and the Bismarck Archipelago. Australia was visited twice, and explorations made of New Zealand and of the Maoris were of particular significance. Vast quantities of ethnographic and scientific data were collected. Before returning to Marseilles, Java, Mauritius, and Ascension were visited" (Hill 517).

 

51. ELLIS & CO. [Publishers]
[Bird's-Eye Panoramic View of] Victoria, B. C. 1889.

Victoria B.C.: Ellis & Co., Publishers of "The Colonist", 1889. Tinted lithograph, printed image ca. 65 x 100cm (26 x 40 inches). With a couple of very minor repaired marginal tears, not affecting printed image. A near fine lithograph.
Rare as Worldcat only locates nine copies. This large lithographic panoramic view shows Victoria B.C. As viewed from a bird's eye from the Strait of San Juan Fuca looking north. This view includes a key which identifies 63 places of interest.
"Erected in 1843 as a Hudson's Bay Company trading post on a site originally called Camosun (the native word was "camosack", meaning "rush of water") known briefly as "Fort Albert", the settlement was renamed Fort Victoria in 1846, in honour of Queen Victoria. The Songhees established a village across the harbour from the fort. The Songhees' village was later moved north of Esquimalt. When the crown colony was established in 1849, a town was laid out on the site and made the capital of the colony. The Chief Factor of the fort, James Douglas was made the second governor of the Vancouver Island Colony (Richard Blanshard was first governor, Arthur Edward Kennedy was third and last governor), and would be the leading figure in the early development of the city until his retirement in 1864..,
With the discovery of gold on the British Columbia mainland in 1855, Victoria became the port, supply base, and outfitting centre for miners on their way to the Fraser Canyon gold fields, mushrooming from a population of 300 to over 5000 literally within a few days. Victoria was incorporated as a city in 1862. In 1865, Esquimalt was made the North Pacific home of the Royal Navy, and remains Canada's west coast naval base. In 1866 when the island was politically united with the mainland, Victoria was designated the capital of the new united colony instead of New Westminster - an unpopular move on the Mainland - and became the provincial capital when British Columbia joined the Canadian Confederation in 1871" (Wikipedia); Reps 38.


52. FORBIN, Louis-Nicolas-Philippe-Auguste, de (1777-1841)
[Egypt] Ruines du Temple de Carnak à Thébes. Egypte.

[Paris]: [Imprimerie Royale], 1819. Uncoloured aquatint, printed image ca. 46 x 53,5 cm (18.5 x 21.5 inches). Engraved by M. Debucourt. Aquatint slightly waved, title closely trimmed, otherwise a very good aquatint.
Plate 62 from the Atlas to Forbin’s "Voyage dans Le Levant en 1817 et 1818" (Paris, 1819; two editions were published the same year, our plate is from one of them). This was "one of the first important French books to use lithography on a grand scale, with the scarce first edition, of which Brunet states that only 325 copies were printed. Most of the plates, after Lecomte, Deseynes, Castellan, Carle and Horace Vernet, Fragonard, Thienon, Legros, Isabey and others, illustrate views in Egypt and Syria, including the famous view of Drovetti, French consul in Egypt, measuring a giant head" (PBA Galleries).
"In 1816 Forbin replaced Denon as Director of Museums, and in August 1817 he undertook a semi-official year-long voyage to the Levant, having been authorized to purchase antiquities for the Louvre. He travelled to Milos, where his son-in-law Marcellus had negotiated the purchase of the recently discovered Venus de Milo, and from there to Athens, Constantinople, Asia Minor, Syria and Palestine, from Jaffa he travelled overland to Alexandria and visited Egypt" (Blackmer 614).

 

53. GALIANO, Dionisio Alcalá (1760-1805)
[Map of the North Pacific Coastline from the top of Vancouver Island to the tip of the Alaskan Peninsula] Continuacion des los reconocimientos hechos en la Costa No. De America por los Buques de S.M. An varias Campañas des de 1774 á 1792.

Madrid, 1802. Uncoloured copper-engraved map ca. 37 x47 cm. (14.5 x 19 inches). Bottom half of left margin trimmed to neat line, evidently as issued, old folds, otherwise the map is in very good condition.
This is a very rare "coastal chart from the top of Vancouver Island to the Alaska peninsula and Unalaska, made from actual observations, showing the routes of the expeditions from 1788 to 1792. from the Atlas del Viage de las Goletas Sutil y Mexicana al reconocimiento del Estracho de Juan de Fuca in 1792, which accompanied the Relacion del viage..., the record of an important voyage up the Pacific coast, and the last to be undertaken by Spain. Often attributed to José de Espinosa y Tello, but more probably by Galiano, the commander of the expedition, the work itself is an important relation of the voyage that brought the Spaniards to Nootka Sound at the same time as the English explorer George Vancouver. The nine maps in the atlas, however, are perhaps even more significant, presenting a rare record of Spanish cartography in the New World. This is map no. 3 in the atlas" (PBA Galleries); Hayes p.77-9.


54. GRAFF, Anton (1736-1813) and BAUSE, Johann Friedrich (1738-1814)
[Portrait of Johann Reinhold Forster] I.R. Forster. Diese Pftantze in nehmlicher Gröβe, hat Herr Prof. Forster in Neu Seeland entdeckt, und Linne’ ihm zu Ehren Forstera benennt.

Leipzig: Bause, 1781. Uncoloured copper engraving, ca. 26,5 x 19 cm (11 x 7.5 inches). Ant. Graff pinx. I.F. Bause sculps. Lips 1781 Three minor horizontal creases through the image, otherwise a very good wide margined engraving.
Very Rare print as only one copy found in Worldcat. Attractive engraved portrait of Johann Reinhold Forster (1729-1798), the naturalist on James Cook's second Pacific voyage (1772-1775), where he was accompanied with his son Georg Forster. The portrait depicts Forster head and shoulders, turned three quarters, in a decorative oval frame surrounded with the leaves and flowers of Forstera – New Zealand endemic plant discovered by father and son Forsters during Cook’s voyage and named after them by Carl Linnaeus.
"When Joseph Banks withdrew at the last moment as naturalist on Cook's second voyage, Forster and his son were appointed to fill the vacant position. In July 1772 they set sail on the Resolution, returning to England in July 1775. During a stop in Cape Town, Forster engaged Anders Sparrman to act as his assistant. Both the Forsters kept detailed diaries of everything they saw on the voyage, and made extensive collections of both natural history specimens and artifacts. On his return Forster published Observations Made during a Voyage round the World (1778). However the income from the book was insufficient to clear his debts, and the bulk of Georg's drawings from the voyage had to be sold to Joseph Banks" (Wikipedia).

 

55. GREVEDON, Henry
[Portrait of Sir Joseph Banks]: Banks.

[Paris]: Charles Motte, [1826]. Lithograph portrait ca. 29 x 27 cm (11.5 x 10.5 inches). Lith. De C. Motte. Blind stamp "Contemporains Etrangers" under the image. With some mild edge wear, otherwise a very good wide margined lithograph.
Lithograph portrait of Sir Joseph Banks published as a part of "Contemporains etrangers, ou Recueil iconographique des etrangers les plus celebres dans la Politique, la Guerre, les Lettres, les Sciences et les Arts depuis 1779 jusqu'a nos jours" (Paris, 1826, 32 plates).
"Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GCB, PRS (1743-1820) was an English naturalist, botanist and patron of the natural sciences. He took part in Captain James Cook's first great voyage (1768-1771). Banks is credited with the introduction to the Western world of eucalyptus, acacia, mimosa and the genus named after him, Banksia. Approximately 80 species of plants bear Banks's name. Banks was also the leading founder of the African Association, a British organization dedicated to the exploration of Africa, and a member of the Society of Dilettanti, which helped to establish the Royal Academy" (Wikipedia).

 

56. GRINDLAY, Captain Robert Melville (1786-1877) and DANIELL, William (1769-1837)
Morning View from Calliann, near Bombay.

London: Smith, Elder & Co., [1826]. Hand coloured aquatint by R.G. Reeve, printed image ca. 28.5 x 21.5 cm (11.5 x 8.5 inches). A fine aquatint.
Plate 19 from Captain Grindlay’s "Scenery, Costumes and Architecture Chiefly on the Western Side of India" (2 vols., London, 1826-30), "the most attractive colour plate book on India" (Tooley 239).
"Grindlay, a self-taught amateur artist, went to India in 1803, aged 17. He served with the East India Company's military service from 1804-20 and during this period made a large number of sketches and drawings recording the life and landscape of India" (Christie’s).
Callian (Kalyan) is about 30 miles to the north-east of Mumbai. Grindlay wrote that from that vantage point the "Bhow Mullan and Parbhool mountains of the Satpura range showed "dense mist" that "often lingers till noonday in picturesque wreaths along the mountain-side ... [giving] them the appearance of ... Gigantic Gothic Cathedrals" (British Library); Abbey Travel 442; Tooley (1954) 239.

 

57. GUIGNES, Chretien Louis Joseph de (1759-1845)
[Two Sheet Map of China Which Traces the Route Followed by the Author from Peking to Canton in the Years 1794 and 1795] Carte d'une Partie de la Chine sur Laquelle est Tracee la Route qu'a Suivie l'Auteur Depuis Quanton Jesqu'a Peking et Depuis Peking jusqu'a Quanton dans les Annees 1794 et 1795. Map from the Atlas Volume of "Voyages a Peking, Manille et l'Île de France faits dans l'intervalle des années 1784 a 1801."

Paris: De l'Imprimerie Impériale, 1808. Uncoloured copper engraved map on two sheets each ca. 54 x 51 cm (21.5 x 20 inches). Map with a small minor tear into image but overall both plan and map in very good condition.
This detailed map on two sheets shows the author's Route from Beijing to Guangzhou. "Guignes, like his father before him, became an Orientalist scholar. He was appointed French resident in China and Consul in 1784. Ten years later, in 1794-95, he was an interpreter with the Dutch Embassy to Peking. In all, he spent seventeen years in China. This book, quite a comprehensive account, touches upon such subjects as industry, trades, professions, foreign trading companies etc." (Hill 733).
The Titsing Mission to China in 1794-95 Included "Guignes, who had lived in Canton for ten years and knew Chinese, and six others. The embassy spent fifty days crossing China, many of the roads proving impassable because of the unusually cold weather. They arrived exhausted at Peking on 11.1.95, but were received by the emperor on the following day" (Howgego T45); Cordier Sinica 2351-2; Lust 336.


58. GUIGNES, Chretien Louis Joseph de (1759-1845)
Plan de la Ville de Macao [Plan of the City of Macao] [with] Carte de L'Entre de Macao avec la Route des Vaisseaux pour se Rendre a Wampou et Celle des Bateaux du Pays pour Aller par L'interieur a Quanton [Map of the Coastline Between Guangzhou and Macao]. Out of the Atlas Volume of Voyages a Peking, Manille et l'Île de France faits dans l'intervalle des années 1784 a 1801.

Paris: De l'Imprimerie Impériale, 1808. Two uncoloured copper engravings ca. 45 x 37.5 cm (18 x 14.5 inches) and 46 x 41cm (18.5 x 16.5 inches). Map with a small minor tear into image but overall both plan and map in very good condition.
The plan of Macao with a key to 44 of the main sights of the city. "Guignes, like his father before him, became an Orientalist scholar. He was appointed French resident in China and Consul in 1784. Ten years later, in 1794-95, he was an interpreter with the Dutch Embassy to Peking. In all, he spent seventeen years in China. This book, quite a comprehensive account, touches upon such subjects as industry, trades, professions, foreign trading companies etc." (Hill 733).
The Titsing Mission to China in 1794-95 Included "Guignes, who had lived in Canton for ten years and knew Chinese, and six others. The embassy spent fifty days crossing China, many of the roads proving impassable because of the unusually cold weather. They arrived exhausted at Peking on 11.1.95, but were received by the emperor on the following day" (Howgego T45); Cordier Sinica 2351-2; Lust 336.


59. GUIGNES, Chretien Louis Joseph de (1759-1845)
[A Series of Eight Views of Peking (Beijing) out of the Atlas Volume of Voyages a Peking, Manille et l'Île de France faits dans l'intervalle des années 1784 a 1801. Included are: 1. Arc de Triomphe a une Lieue et Demie Avant Peking; 2. Vue des Jardins de L'Empereur a Peking; 3. L'Empereur Prenant un Divertissement sur un Lac Glace; 4. Porte de la Ville Tartare a Peking; 5. Fete Donne Devant L'Empereur a Yuen-Ming-Yuen; 6. Enceinte Exterieure du Palais; 7. Enceinte Interieure du Palais a Peking; 8. Interieur de Peking. All engravings drawn by De Guignes and engraved by Deseve.]

Paris: De l'Imprimerie Impériale, 1808. Uncoloured copper engravings ca. 21 x 35 cm (8.5 x 14 inches) and slightly smaller. Some very mild foxing otherwise very good wide margined engravings.
These fine and detailed engravings give us a vivid impression of late 18th century Beijing. "Guignes, like his father before him, became an Orientalist scholar. He was appointed French resident in China and Consul in 1784. Ten years later, in 1794-95, he was an interpreter with the Dutch Embassy to Peking. In all, he spent seventeen years in China. This book, quite a comprehensive account, touches upon such subjects as industry, trades, professions, foreign trading companies etc."(Hill 733).
The Titsing Mission to China in 1794-95 Included "Guignes, who had lived in Canton for ten years and knew Chinese, and six others. The embassy spent fifty days crossing China, many of the roads proving impassable because of the unusually cold weather. They arrived exhausted at Peking on 11.1.95, but were received by the emperor on the following day" (Howgego T45); Cordier Sinica 2351-2; Lust 336.


60. HASSENSTEIN, B[runo] (1839-1902)
[Map of the Discoveries of the British North American Exploring Expedition] Karte von J. Palliser's Expedition zur Erforschung der Rocky Mountains in Britisch Nord-Amerika, 1858.., [With] Karte der Red River Expedition in Britisch Nord-Amerika Unter Gladman, Hind, Napier, Dawson &c. [Two Sheets Joined into one].

Gotha: Justus Perthes, 1860. Outline hand coloured lithographed map ca. 25 x 86 cm. (10 x 34 inches). The two sheet joined in one lithographed map with original folds is in near fine condition.
This detailed map is out of Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen and shows the discoveries of the British North American Exploring Expedition. This expedition is "commonly called the Palliser Expedition, explored and surveyed the open prairies and rugged wilderness of western Canada from 1857 to 1860. The purpose was to explore possible routes for the Canadian Pacific Railway and discover new species of plants. The expedition was led by John Palliser" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J, p. 284-5.

 

61. HEAD, Charles Francklin, Captain (1796-1849)
View of Suez Taken from the North East.

London: Smith, Elder and Co., [1833]. Drawn on stone by W. Walton, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph, printed image ca. 28 x 45 cm (11 x 18 inches). Slightly age-toned, otherwise a very good lithograph.
A plate from Head’s "Eastern and Egyptian Scenery, Ruins &c. Accompanied with Descriptive Notes. of a Journey from India to Europe, Intended to shew the Advantage And Practicability of Steam Navigation from England to India" (London, 1833). The view shows a city panorama with boats in the foreground, and a European traveler being carried on to shore from a boat by a native servant.
"Captain Head describes his purpose in publishing this work as twofold: 'to promote a rapid communication with India by way of Egypt, through the agency of steam navigation, and, as a natural consequence of this measure, to secure our Indian frontier against the perils of northern invasion'. The plates are mostly of the monuments of Egypt but also include views of Bombay, Jedda, Mocha and Malta" (Blackmer sale 673); Blackmer 799, Gay 1846.
"Captain Head was an officer in the Queen’s Royal Regiment. After serving in India, he travelled home to England using a detour on what became the well-trodden Overland Route. Arriving from Qusayr from Jiddah and Bombay on 29 December 1829, he crossed the desert to the Nile, visited Thebes [Luxor], and travelled on down river reaching Alexandria on 18 February 1830. On his return to England he published Eastern and Egyptian Scenery, Ruins, &c (1833), a series of lithographs after his own sketches that showed the celebrated monuments accessible from the Overland Route" (Victoria and Albert Museum on-line).

 

62. HOMANN HEIRS
Mappa Geographica, Complectens I. Indiae Occidentalis Partem Mediam Circum Isthmum Panamensem II. Ipsumq. Isthmum III. Ichnographiam Praecipuorum Locorum & Portuum [Map of Central America and the Caribbean Sea].

Nuernberg, 1731. Hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 57 x 48 cm. (22.5 x 19 inches). Margins closely cropped to plate mark, with no loss of image, otherwise a very good map.
"This informative and very graphic folio sheet has a large map of the region, titled "Carte des Isles de l'Amerique et Deplusieurs Pays de Terre Ferme," attributed to D'Anville (1731). It covers the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and all of the Caribbean islands. It is nicely detailed with a key to show European possessions and a beautifully engraved title cartouche. Above the main map is the large, decorative title cartouche, flanked by insets of the isthmus of Panama and a plan of St. Augustine in Florida. Below the map is a large view of Mexico City, flanked by plans of Vera Cruz and San Domingo. A very handsome sheet, absolutely filled with information on the West Indies" (Old World Auctions).


63. HONDIUS, Henricus (the Younger) (1597-1651)
[MAP of ASIA] Asia Recens Summa cura Delineata.

Amsterdam, 1631. Original full hand coloured copper engraved map 37.5 x 50 cm (15 x 20 inches). Original centre fold. A fine wide margined map.
In 1630 Henricus Hondius and Jansson undertook a major revision of the Mercator Atlas to reflect new advances in geographical knowledge and to compete with the Blaeu family. This map is based on his brother Jodocus Jr's 1623 map of Asia, but without the decorative panels. The map is also a little larger in its geographical extent. This later version by Henricus Hondius became the standard map of Asia found in subsequent Mercator-Hondius atlases" (Mapping the Continent of Asia 33); Koeman Atlantes Neerlandici 8000:1D.2.
The decorative map shows Asia bordered on the West by Greece and Africa, East extending out past Japan, South to Java, and North to Nova Zembla. The decorative cartouche shows to Asian figures and the oceans are decorated with ships and sea monsters.

 

64. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of the Arctike Pole, or Northern World – Polus Arcticus cum Vicinis Regionibus.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 13.5 x 18 cm (5.5 x 7 inches). Right margin of map slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

65. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of Florida – Virginia et Florida.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 15 x 18.5 cm (6 x 7.5 inches). A near fine map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

66. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
[ICELAND] Hondius his Map of Island.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 13.5 x 18 cm (5.5 x 7 inches). Left margin of map slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

67. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of Hispaniola, Cuba, etc.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 14.5 x 18 cm (5.5 x 7 inches). Right margin of map very slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

68. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of America Meridionalis.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 14.5 x 18.5 cm (5.5 x 7.5 inches). A near fine map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

69. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of the Magellan Streight - Fretum Magellani.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 13 x 17.5 cm (5 x 6.5 inches). A near fine map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

70. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of America - Americae Descrip.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 15 x 19 cm (6 x 7.5 inches). Right margin of map slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

71. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of Tartaria.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 14 x 18.5 cm (5.5 x 7.5 inches). Left margin of map very slightly cropped, repaired tear of margin, otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

72. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of New Spaine - Hispania Nova.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 14 x 18.5 cm (5.5 x 7.5 inches). Right margin of map very slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

73. HONDIUS, Jodocus (1563-1612) & MERCATOR, Gerardus (1512-94)
Hondius his Map of China.

London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 15 x 18.5 cm (6 x 7.5 inches). Right margin of map very slightly cropped otherwise a very good map.
This map was originally published in Mercator's Atlas Minor and is reissued here on a text leaf from the third part of Purchas His Pilgrimes in Five Bookes (London, 1625). Purchas His Pilgrimes is a "great geographical collection [which] is a continuation and enlargement of Haklyut's The Principal Navigations" (Hill 1403). Jodocus Hondius "was a Dutch engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. He helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century" (Wikipedia). Tooley's Mapmakers E-J p.364-5.

 

74. HOUBRAKEN, Jacobus (1698-1780), engraver
Sir Francis Drake.

[Amsterdam], ca. 1750. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 34,5 x 21 cm (13.5 x 8.5 inches). Recently matted. Trimmed close to the image, otherwise a very good engraving.
Rare unfinished proof before letters of the copper engraved portrait of Sir Francis Drake after the painting by Sir Godfrey Kneller. Drake is shown in an oval cartouche frame decorated with cannon balls, guns, anchors and sails, and a naval battle scene under the portrait. The engraving was published in Thomas Birch's "Heads of the Illustrious Persons of Great Britain" (London, 1743-52, 2 vols.).
"Sir Francis Drake, Vice Admiral (1540-1596) was an English sea captain, privateer, navigator, slaver, and politician of the Elizabethan era. Elizabeth I of England awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581. He was second-in-command of the English fleet against the Spanish Armada in 1588. He also carried out the second circumnavigation of the world, from 1577 to 1580" (Wikipedia).

 

75. JANSSONIUS, Johannes (1588-1664)
Mar di Aethiopia Vulgo Oceanus Aethiopicus [Map of the South Atlantic with Africa, South America and Antarctica].

Amsterdam, 1647. Outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 44 x 56 cm. (17 x 22 inches). A strong impression. With some very mild foxing, otherwise the map is in very good condition.
"The sea chart of the Atlantic Ocean featured here first appeared in Jansson's Atlantis Majoris and includes almost the whole of South America and the western and southern coastlines of Africa.., An elongated landmass along the lower border is labelled Terra Australis Incognita..," (Norwich 240). Janssonius "formed a partnership with his brother in law Henricus Hondius, and together they published atlases as Mercator/Hondius/Janssonius. Under the leadership of Janssonius the Hondius Atlas was steadily enlarged. Renamed Atlas Novus, it had three volumes in 1638" (Wikipedia).


76. KOTZEBUE, Otto von (1787-1846)
Ansicht der Insel Birick, zur Gruppe Canven gehörig, in Radack [View of the Birick Island of the Canven Group in Radak].

Weimar: Gebruedern Hoffmann, 1821. Sepia aquatint, printed image ca. 20,5x30 cm (8 x 12 inches). Engraved by P. Skerl, Dresden. Original centre fold, otherwise a very good aquatint.
A plate from Otto von Kotzebue’s "Entdeckungs-Reise in die Süd-See und nach der Berings-Strasse zur Erforschung einer nordöstlichen Durchfahrt" (3 vols, Weimar, 1821). The plate shows one of the atolls of the Ratak Chain of the modern Marshall Islands, with the picturesque palm trees on the beach and native boats in the sea in the foreground. Kotzebue visited the Ratak Chain in 1817 during his voyage across the Pacific Ocean to Kamchatka and Russian America.
This voyage was "the second Russian circumnavigation and the first for scientific purposes, sponsored by Count Romanzoff, one of Russia's greatest patrons of the sciences. It proved to be one of the most important and fruitful of all Russian circumnavigations, contributing greatly to knowledge of the South Seas, Pacific Northwest and Alaska, although without finding the North-West Passage (here termed the North-East by Kotzebue). [Kotzebue] commanded the Rurick and knew the North Pacific well from his earlier voyage with Krusenstern. With him were Louis Choris, expedition artist, and Adelbert von Chamisso, naturalist. Their valuable study of Pacific islands included Easter Island, the Tuamotus, Marshalls and the newly-discovered Romanzoff Islands, and Kotzebue's reports on coral atolls were later used by Charles Darwin. Reaching Kamchatka they passed through Bering Strait, explored Kotzebue Sound, and investigated the Pribilof Islands and Aleutians, recording excellent descriptions of the Chukchis, Aleuts and Eskimos. Before crossing the Pacific they made stops on the California coast, at San Francisco, followed by a long stay in Hawaii at the court of King Kamehameha I, handsomely portrayed by Choris. Choris' own illustrated account of the voyage was published in 1822" (Christies).

 

77. KRUSENSTERN, Adam Johann von (1770-1846)
[Six plates from the second part of the famous fully engraved ‘Atlas Yuzhnogo Moria...’ [Atlas of the South Sea] including the title page, half-title "Severnoe Polusharie" ("Northern Hemisphere"), list of maps and plates, and three maps of the Mariana Islands including Guam].

Saint Petersburg, 1826. Elephant folio copper engravings, ca. 60,5x40,5 cm (24 x 16 inches). Four plates on thick watermarked laid paper, and two on normal paper (additional maps). Title page with some very minor stains, otherwise very good wide margined engravings.
A collection of plates from the first Russian atlas of the Pacific ocean compiled by the famous first Russian circumnavigator Adam von Krusenstern. Our collection includes "Map of the Mariana Islands" (# 29, from part II), with an inset plan of the harbour ‘La Caldera de Apra’ (Apra harbour, Guam); and two unnumbered maps not included in the List of maps and plans of the Atlas: "Map of the North-Western part of the Guaham Island," showing the harbour la Caldera de Apra and fortress Santa Crus de los Dolores; and a detailed plan of the harbour la Caldera de Apra. Other plates (all copper engraved) are title page, half-title "Severnoe Polusharie" ("Northern Hemisphere"), and "List of maps and plans of the Atlas" (for both parts).
"The Atlas of the South Sea" was compiled by Krusenstern on the basis of Russian surveys and discoveries in the Pacific, both his own and ones conducted by Y. Lisiansky, V. Golovnin, P. Rikord, M. Lazarev, O. Kotsebou, F. Luetke and others. It was published in two parts (Saint Petersburg, 1823-1826) as a fully engraved edition with two title pages, two half-titles, engraved dedication leaf, list of maps and 34 plates with 67 maps and plans. The first part was dedicated to the islands of the South Pacific, second part – to the North Pacific, including Alaska, Aleutian and Kurile Islands, Sakhalin, Japan, Sandwich, Mariana, Marshall Islands, coast of the southwestern China et al. The Atlas became one of the first detailed Russian surveys of the Pacific and received the Demidov Prize – the highest award of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It was supplemented with the explanatory text (2 parts, Saint Petersburg, 1823-26).


78. KRUSENSTERN, Adam Johann von (1770-1846)
& UKHTOMSKY, Andrei Grigorievich (1771-1852).
"Grobnitsa Kapitana Klerka v Petropavlovske. Captain Clerkes Grabmal im Hafen St. Peter und Paul" [Captain Clerkes’ Tomb in Petropavlovsk].

Saint Petersburg: Morskaya Typ., 1813. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 34 x 52 cm (13.5 x 20.5 inches). Title in Russian and German. Upper margin strengthened, mild water stains on upper and lower blank margins, otherwise a very good wide margined engraving.
Plate XVIII from the Russian edition of the Atlas of Krusenstern’s circumnavigation in 1803-1806 (“Atlas k Puteshestviiu Vokrug Sveta Kapitana Krusensterna”, Sain Petersburg, 1813). The complete Atlas is a great rarity with only one copy found in Worldcat, and separate engravings are also very rare even in Russia. The Atlas contained 109 engraved plates and was one of the most luxurious Russian editions of the beginning of the 19th century, being issued on funds of the Cabinet of the Russian Emperor and costing 15 thousand roubles.
The engraving depicts the tomb of Charles Clerke (1741-1779), a participant in all three James Cook’s circumnavigations who after Cook’s death in 1779 took the command of the third expedition and continued searching for the Northwest Passage. “Clerke is notable for being the author of the first account of Captain Cook’s death, as his letter to the Admiralty mentioning Cook’s murder on Hawaii and written in Kamchatka on June 8, 1779, was first published as a pamphlet in Reval in 1780” (Hawaiian National Bibliography 18).
Clerke died from tuberculosis not far from Kamchatka and was buried in Petropavlovsk, next to the grave of another explorer, Louis Delisle de la Croyère (about 1685-1741). The latter participated in Vitus Bering’s expedition to the North Pacific in 1741 and as many other expedition members, including Bering himself, died on the hard way back to Kamchatka. The sailors from Krusenstern’s expedition while staying in Petropavlovsk in September 1805, renewed the tombs constructing a wooden pyramid with commemorative boards above both graves. Krusenstern described this event in the account. This plate shows how connected the first explorers of the North Pacific were.
The engraving was made from the drawing from life by Wilhelm Gottlieb Tilesius von Tilenau (1769-1857), German naturalist and artist who participated in Krusenstern’s expedition. The engraver, Andrey Ukhtomsky was a prominent Russian artist, a member of the Russian Academy of Arts (1808), the head of the printing house of the Academy, and the curator of the Academy’s library.

 

79. LA PEROUSE, Jean-Francois Galaup de (1741-1788)
[Complete Set of Seven Maps and Coastal Views of the North West Coast of America from Mount St. Elias to Monterey Bay by La Perouse's Expedition Includung]: Carte Generale d'une Partie de la Cote du Nord-Ouest de l'Amerique Reconnue par les Fregates Francaises La Boussole et Astrolabe; [With Three Sheets 1-3]: Carte Particuliere de la Cote du Nord-Ouest de l'Amerique Reconnue par les Fregates Francaises la Boussole et l'Astrolabe en 1786; [With Three Sheet]: Vues de la Cote du Nord-Ouest de l'Amerique Reconne par les Fregates Francaises la Boussole et l'Astrolabe en 1786 ... From Voyage de La Perouse Autour du Monde, Publie Conformement au Decret du 22 Avril 1791.

Paris: Chez Plassan, 1797. Together seven uncoloured copper engravings ca. 67 x 50 cm (26.5 x 19.5 inches); three maps ca. 50x69 cm (19.5 x 27 inches); three costal views ca. 31 x 47 cm (12 x 18.5 inches). One engraving with a small minor marginal damp stain, all engravings with original folds, otherwise in very good condition.
"La Perouse's expedition was one of the most important scientific explorations ever undertaken to the Pacific and the west coast of North America. La Perouse was a naval veteran of the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). During the latter, he and his men captured and razed Fort York and Fort Prince of Wales, of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1782. In 1785 this expedition sailed from France with La Perouse in command of two frigates; he captained the Boussole, while her sister ship, the Astrolabe was captained by Paul-Antoine Langle. The charge to the expedition was to examine such parts of the region as had not been explored by Captain Cook: to seek for an interoceanic passage; to make scientific observations on the various countries, peoples, and products; to obtain reliable information about the fur trade and the extent of the Spanish settlements in California; and to promote the inducements for French enterprise in that quarter. Articles taken along on the voyage to trade with the natives included 1,000,000 assorted pins, four large German organs, and fifty-two plumed dragoon's helmets. La Perouse and his men did important geographical research, allowing contemporary geographers to make comparisons with the charts of Russian, English, and Spanish navigators. The voyage also included the first foreign scientific group ever to visit Alta California, in 1786. In the waters of eastern Asia, the voyagers found and named La Perouse Strait between Sakhalin and Hokkaido Islands. Accounts are given of Easter Island, Hawaii, Macao, Formosa, the Aleutian Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Australia. Laperouse sent dispatches back to France from Kamchatka and Botany Bay. The two ships then set sail from Botany Bay, in 1788 and were never heard from again. The mystery of their disappearance caused a world-wide sensation and led directly to the 1791 expedition under Captain D'Entrecasteaux. These two voyages were the chief French exploring efforts of the eighteenth century. D'Entrecasteaux did not solve the mystery of La Perouse's fate, however; the wrecks of the Boussole and the Astrolabe were not discovered until thirty-nine years later, on the reef of Vanikoro, one of the Santa Cruz Islands, by Peter Dillon" (Hill 972).


80. LA PEROUSE, Jean-Francois Galaup de (1741-1788)
[One of Earliest Maps of San Francisco Bay] Plan du Port de St. Francois, Situe sur la Cote de la California Septentrionale. La Pointe des Rois par 37°59' de Latitude Nord. Plan from "Voyage de La Perouse Autour du Monde, Publie Conformement au Decret du 22 Avril 1791."

Paris: Chez Plassan, 1797. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 50 x 33.5 cm (19.5 x 13 inches). With original folds, otherwise a very good plan.
"This uncommon chart is one of the earliest obtainable maps of San Francisco Bay. La Perouse sailed the California coast in 1786 before setting out for the Philippines on his fateful expedition. His map was based on Dalrymple's map of 1789 with information derived from Spanish sources including Josef Camacho and Jose de Canizares. The map includes 21 place names, including Alcatraz and the Presidio" (Old World Auctions).
"La Perouse's expedition was one of the most important scientific explorations ever undertaken to the Pacific and the west coast of North America. La Perouse was a naval veteran of the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). During the latter, he and his men captured and razed Fort York and Fort Prince of Wales, of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1782. In 1785 this expedition sailed from France with La Perouse in command of two frigates; he captained the Boussole, while her sister ship, the Astrolabe was captained by Paul-Antoine Langle. The charge to the expedition was to examine such parts of the region as had not been explored by Captain Cook: to seek for an interoceanic passage; to make scientific observations on the various countries, peoples, and products; to obtain reliable information about the fur trade and the extent of the Spanish settlements in California; and to promote the inducements for French enterprise in that quarter. Articles taken along on the voyage to trade with the natives included 1,000,000 assorted pins, four large German organs, and fifty-two plumed dragoon's helmets. La Perouse and his men did important geographical research, allowing contemporary geographers to make comparisons with the charts of Russian, English, and Spanish navigators. The voyage also included the first foreign scientific group ever to visit Alta California, in 1786. In the waters of eastern Asia, the voyagers found and named La Perouse Strait between Sakhalin and Hokkaido Islands. Accounts are given of Easter Island, Hawaii, Macao, Formosa, the Aleutian Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Australia. Laperouse sent dispatches back to France from Kamchatka and Botany Bay. The two ships then set sail from Botany Bay, in 1788 and were never heard from again. The mystery of their disappearance caused a world-wide sensation and led directly to the 1791 expedition under Captain D'Entrecasteaux. These two voyages were the chief French exploring efforts of the eighteenth century. D'Entrecasteaux did not solve the mystery of La Perouse's fate, however; the wrecks of the Boussole and the Astrolabe were not discovered until thirty-nine years later, on the reef of Vanikoro, one of the Santa Cruz Islands, by Peter Dillon" (Hill 972).

 

81. LA PEROUSE, Jean-Francois Galaup de (1741-1788)
[Two Plates Showing Manila Bay & Costumes of the Inhabitants of Manila]: Vue de Cavite dans la Baie de Manille; Costumes Des Habitans de Manille. Plates from "Voyage de La Perouse Autour du Monde, Publie Conformement au Decret du 22 Avril 1791."

Paris: Chez Plassan, 1797. Two uncoloured copper engravings each ca. 27.5 x 40.5 cm (11 x 16 inches). The view of Manila Bay with a repaired tear affecting image and slightly creased, otherwise two very good engravings.
"La Perouse's expedition was one of the most important scientific explorations ever undertaken to the Pacific and the west coast of North America. La Perouse was a naval veteran of the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). During the latter, he and his men captured and razed Fort York and Fort Prince of Wales, of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1782. In 1785 this expedition sailed from France with La Perouse in command of two frigates; he captained the Boussole, while her sister ship, the Astrolabe was captained by Paul-Antoine Langle. The charge to the expedition was to examine such parts of the region as had not been explored by Captain Cook: to seek for an interoceanic passage; to make scientific observations on the various countries, peoples, and products; to obtain reliable information about the fur trade and the extent of the Spanish settlements in California; and to promote the inducements for French enterprise in that quarter. Articles taken along on the voyage to trade with the natives included 1,000,000 assorted pins, four large German organs, and fifty-two plumed dragoon's helmets.
La Perouse and his men did important geographical research, allowing contemporary geographers to make comparisons with the charts of Russian, English, and Spanish navigators. The voyage also included the first foreign scientific group ever to visit Alta California, in 1786. In the waters of eastern Asia, the voyagers found and named La Perouse Strait between Sakhalin and Hokkaido Islands. Accounts are given of Easter Island, Hawaii, Macao, Formosa, the Aleutian Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Australia. Laperouse sent dispatches back to France from Kamchatka and Botany Bay. The two ships then set sail from Botany Bay, in 1788 and were never heard from again. The mystery of their disappearance caused a world-wide sensation and led directly to the 1791 expedition under Captain D'Entrecasteaux. These two voyages were the chief French exploring efforts of the eighteenth century. D'Entrecasteaux did not solve the mystery of La Perouse's fate, however; the wrecks of the Boussole and the Astrolabe were not discovered until thirty-nine years later, on the reef of Vanikoro, one of the Santa Cruz Islands, by Peter Dillon" (Hill 972).


82. LA PEROUSE, Jean-Francois Galaup de (1741-1788)
[One of the Earliest Views of Maui]: Vue du Mouillage des Fregates Francaises A L'ile de Mowee. Plate from "Voyage de La Perouse Autour du Monde, Publie Conformement au Decret du 22 Avril 1791."

Paris: Chez Plassan, 1797. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 27.5 x 40.5 cm (11 x 16 inches). A very good wide margined engraving.
"La Perouse's expedition was one of the most important scientific explorations ever undertaken to the Pacific and the west coast of North America. La Perouse was a naval veteran of the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). During the latter, he and his men captured and razed Fort York and Fort Prince of Wales, of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1782. In 1785 this expedition sailed from France with La Perouse in command of two frigates; he captained the Boussole, while her sister ship, the Astrolabe was captained by Paul-Antoine Langle. The charge to the expedition was to examine such parts of the region as had not been explored by Captain Cook: to seek for an interoceanic passage; to make scientific observations on the various countries, peoples, and products; to obtain reliable information about the fur trade and the extent of the Spanish settlements in California; and to promote the inducements for French enterprise in that quarter. Articles taken along on the voyage to trade with the natives included 1,000,000 assorted pins, four large German organs, and fifty-two plumed dragoon's helmets.
La Perouse and his men did important geographical research, allowing contemporary geographers to make comparisons with the charts of Russian, English, and Spanish navigators. The voyage also included the first foreign scientific group ever to visit Alta California, in 1786. In the waters of eastern Asia, the voyagers found and named La Perouse Strait between Sakhalin and Hokkaido Islands. Accounts are given of Easter Island, Hawaii, Macao, Formosa, the Aleutian Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Australia. Laperouse sent dispatches back to France from Kamchatka and Botany Bay. The two ships then set sail from Botany Bay, in 1788 and were never heard from again. The mystery of their disappearance caused a world-wide sensation and led directly to the 1791 expedition under Captain D'Entrecasteaux. These two voyages were the chief French exploring efforts of the eighteenth century. D'Entrecasteaux did not solve the mystery of La Perouse's fate, however; the wrecks of the Boussole and the Astrolabe were not discovered until thirty-nine years later, on the reef of Vanikoro, one of the Santa Cruz Islands, by Peter Dillon" (Hill 972).

 

83. LABILLARDIERE, Jacques Julien Houten de (1755-1834)
Four Bird Plates from the "Atlas of Relation du Voyage a la Recherche de La Perouse, Fait par Ordre de l'Assemblee Constituante, Pendant les annees 1791, 1792, et pendant le 1ere. et la 2de. annee de la Republique Francoise." The Engravings Include: 1. Cigne Noir du Cap de Diemen; 2. Calao de L'ile de Waigou; 3. Pie de la Nouvelle Caledonie; 4. Perruche a Taches Noires du Cap de Diemen.

Paris: H.J. Jansen, An VIII [i.e. 1800]. Four uncoloured copper engravings each ca. 27 x 40 cm (10.5 x 15.5 inches) and 46 x 41cm (18.5 x 16.5 inches). Very good wide margined engravings.
An attractive collection of bird plates including the famous Black Swan which is indigenous to Australia and New Zealand. "After three years had passed by without any news of the ill-fated expedition under La Pérouse, the French Government sent out to the South Seas two vessels under the command of D'Entrecasteaux and Kermadee to search for him. Among the scientists on board was the naturalist Labillardière. Although entirely unsuccessful in its search, the voyage was of considerable importance. Labillardière gives the first scientific description of the New Zealand flax, and brought back several New Zealand plants. He describes the visits paid by the expedition to Tasmania, New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, etc." (Cox I, p. 67-68).


84. LEAKE, Lieutenant Colonel W[illiam] M[artin] Royal Engineers (1777-1860)
Map of Egypt; [With Inset] Supplement to the Map of Egypt or Course of the Nile from Essouan to the Confines of Dongola.

London: J. Arrowsmith, 1840. A very large outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 130 x 76cm (51 x 30 inches). The map is dissected into 40 sections and backed on linen. The map is in very good condition.
"This extremely detailed map of the course of the Nile was produced by William Martin Leake, a leading British authority on the topography of the region. In March 1802, Leake was employed to make a general survey of Egypt together with W.R. Hamilton and Charles Hayes. On his return to England, his ship sank and all Leake's valuable notes on the Egyptian survey perished. His chart was subsequently published in 1818 after his retirement, incorporating additional material from Sir Alexander Bryce, M. Nouet, and others. The map provides extensive information on the Nile, ancient ruins, the Suez Canal, roads and railways, and is filled with voluminous notations. It extends south to Aswan, and beyond in an inset, as far as Dongola" (Old World Auctions).
"A journey through Asia Minor in 1800 to join the British fleet at Cyprus inspired [Leake] with an interest in antiquarian topography. In 1801, after travelling across the desert with the Turkish army to Egypt, he was, on the expulsion of the French, employed in surveying the valley of the Nile as far as the cataracts; but having sailed with the ship engaged to convey the Elgin marbles from Athens to England, he lost all his maps and observations when the vessel foundered off Cerigo in Greece.
Shortly after his arrival in England he was sent out to survey the coast of Albania and the Morea, with the view of assisting the Turks against attacks of the French from Italy, and of this he took advantage to form a valuable collection of coins and inscriptions and to explore ancient sites. In 1807, war having broken out between Turkey and England, he was made prisoner at Salonica; but, obtaining his release the same year, he was sent on a diplomatic mission to Ali Pasha of Ioannina, whose confidence he completely won, and with whom he remained for more than a year as British representative.
In 1810 he was granted a yearly sum of £600 for his services in Turkey. In 1815 he retired from the army, in which he held the rank of colonel, devoting the remainder of his life to topographical and antiquarian studies. He was admitted a Fellow of the Royal Society on 13 April 1815.
He died at Brighton on the 6 January 1860. The marbles collected by him in Greece were presented to the British Museum; his bronzes, vases, gems and coins were purchased by the University of Cambridge after his death, and are now in the Fitzwilliam Museum. He was also elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, received the honorary DCL at Oxford (1816), and was a member of the Berlin Academy of Sciences and correspondent of the Institute of France" (Wikipedia); Tooley K-P, p.104.


85. LELY, Peter, Sir (1618-1680), (painted by)
Paul Rycaut Esq. late Consul of Smyrna; & Fellow of the Royall Societie.

London, 1680. Uncoloured copper engraving, printed image ca. 23,5 x 15 cm (9.5 x 6 inches). P. Lely Pinxit; R. White Sculpsit. Closely trimmed to image and mounted on old paper, otherwise a very good engraving.
Portrait of Sir Paul Rycaut, half length in an oval frame on a pedestal, wearing long wig and cloak; coat of arms below. The engraving was issued as a frontispiece to Rycaut’s "The History of the Turkish Empire" (London, 1680), and his translation of Lorenzo Gracian's "The Critick" (London, 1681).
"Sir Paul Rycaut FRS (1629-1700) was a British diplomat and historian, and authority on the Ottoman Empire. Rycaut was a private secretary to Heneage Finch, 3rd Earl of Winchilsea, ambassador to Constantinople and later became British Consul and factor at Smyrna" (Wikipedia).
"Rycaut's first major work was The Present State of the Ottoman Empire (1667), a three-part analysis of Ottoman government and society. Attractively illustrated by costume drawings, the Present State was nevertheless intended for serious study by policy makers, and its strength lay in the exceptional range and accuracy of the information obtained by Rycaut from his contacts in the Ottoman bureaucracy. It shaped European perceptions of the Ottomans for a century, and historians continued to see it as unusually fair-minded in its approach, until towards the end of the twentieth century it began to draw criticism for subscribing to the myths of oriental despotism" (Oxford DNB).

 

86. LESPINASSE, Louis Nicolas de (1734-1808)
Vue d’une Partie de la Ville d’Iakoutsk, sur la Rive Occidentale de la Léna, et des Rochers Colonniformes Appellés Stolbi [View of a Part of Yakutsk on the West Bank of Lena River and the Column Shaped Rocks Called Stolbi].

[Paris], [1783]. Hand coloured copper engraving, printed image ca. 24 x 32 cm (9.5 x 12.5 inches). Gravé par Née. A. Pl. 23. Recently matted, minor foxing, otherwise a very good engraving.
Plate 23 from the Atlas to Nicolas Le Clerc’s "Histoire Physique, Morale, Civile et Politique de la Russie Ancienne" (Paris and Versailles: Froullé and Blaizot, 1783-1794; 6 vols. and atlas). Engraved by François Denis Neé, the view shows a spectacular panorama of Iakutsk, Lena River and famous Lena Pillars, with local people and boats in the foreground.
"The atlas volume to Le Clerc's great work is particularly notable for its fine panoramic views of towns and palaces by Auvray, Fessard, Niquet and Née after Louis-Nicolas de Lespinasse. Le Clerc first visited Russia in his profession as doctor in 1759, and in 1769 he received several important appointments in Moscow, giving him the opportunity to correlate many rare and almost unknown historical sources. The publication of this work prompted Catherine II to commission a riposte: Ivan Nikitich Boltin's 2 volume Notes on the History of Ancient and Modern Russia (St. Petersburg, 1788)" (Christie’s); Brunet III, 916; Cohen-de Ricci 613.

 

87. LEWIS, Frederick Christian, the younger (1813-1875), (painted by)
Lieutnt. General James Stuart Fraser. Resident at the Court of His Highness the Nizam, &c.&c.&c. This Portrait Painted by F.C. Lewis, & Engraved by F.C. Lewis, Esqr. Senior (Engraver to the Queen) by Desire of the friends of the General is inscribed by his faithful & very grateful servant The Painter.

[London], ca, 1840. Mezzotint ca. 45 x 31.5 cm (18 x 12.5 inches). Mezzotint with folded margins (worn on folds), age toned, and with some mild water stain, overall a good mezzotint.
Very rare proof copy of the mezzotint portrait of the British East-India Company officer James Stuart Fraser of Ardachy (1783-1869), shown in uniform, sitting in an armchair. No copies found in Worldcat. "Scarce" (Harvey, Fr. A General Catalogue of Rare and Valuable Engraved Portraits. London, n.d., p. 265).
Fraser served as a town-major of Fort St. George (1813), commandant at Pondicherry (1816), resident at Mysore (1834), Travancore and Cochin (1836). "On 31 December 1839 Fraser was appointed resident at Hyderabad, and was vested with a general superintendence over the post offices and post roads of the Nizam's territory. In 1842 he successfully suppressed sepoy insubordination at Secunderabad. He remained at Hyderabad, which he considered the political centre of India, for fourteen years" (Oxford DNB).
The portrait was made by Frederick Christian Lewis the Younger during his visit to Hyderabad in 1839. Lewis widely travelled in the Near East in 1835-1838 (Malta, Constantinople, Persia, Baghdad, Mosul, and Babylon) and stayed in India for over ten years, while receiving "lucrative commissions to paint glittering scenes of durbars and installations of Indian rulers and more subdued portraits of British officials" (Oxford DNB). "At Hyderabad he painted a portrait of the resident, Colonel James Stuart Fraser, and for the Nizam, the Raja Chandu Lal, The Nautch, a work that drew from Sir Edwin Landseer the comment, ‘I think his pictures wonderfully clever - [He] possess[es] the power of rapidly seizing and as rapidly depicting character. I was astonished at some of his heads. They are like Velazquez’" (Oxford DNB).
The mezzotint was produced by the painter’s father, Frederick Christian Lewis Senior (1779-1856), "an English etcher, aquatint and stipple engraver, landscape and portrait painter. His superlative skills as engraver led to frequent commissions from Royalty, and to his contribution to J. M. W. Turner's Liber Studiorum, a collection of seventy-one etchings with mezzotint, greatly influencing landscape painting" (Wikipedia).

 

88. LISIANSKY, Urey (1773-1837)
[Map of] Sitca or Norfolk Sound Surveyed by Captn. Lisiansky 1805. [From:] Voyage Round the World in the Years 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806 Performed by Order of His Imperial Majesty Alexander the First, Emperor of Russia in the ship Neva.

London: John Booth, 1814. A hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 39.5 x 25.5cm (15.5 x 10 inches). Matted map with original folds but otherwise in very good condition.
Rare Map of Sitca Sound. "Sitka Sound is a body of water near the city of Sitka, Alaska. It is bordered by Baranof Island to the south and the northeast, by Kruzof Island to the northwest and by the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. During the early 19th century it was a major locus of the Maritime Fur Trade" (Wikipedia).
This map is from a "most important work dealing with discoveries on the N.W. Coast of America. The author was a captain in the Russian navy and commander of the "Neva." He visited Kodiak and Sitka, wintering at the former island, and his long stay there gave him ample time and scope for a study of the native inhabitants and their habits and customs. The long chart shows the track of the voyage, and there are charts of the Washington Islands, Cadiack, and the Harbor of St. Paul, the coast from Bering’s Bay to Sea Otter Bay, Sitka or Norfolk Sound, etc.; with colored views of the Harbor of St. Paul in the Island of Cadiack. And New Archangel in Norfolk Sound. There are also plates of Indian implements, etc. The work is important also as the principal source for the Sitka Massacre" (Soliday 873).
SOLD

 

89. LISIANSKY, Urey (1773-1837)
Chart of the Coast from Behrings Bay to Sea Otter Bay with Different Settlements of the Natives [From:] Voyage Round the World in the Years 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806 Performed by Order of His Imperial Majesty Alexander the First, Emperor of Russia in the ship Neva.

London: John Booth, 1814. A hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 26 x 19.5cm (10.5 x 8 inches). Matted map in very good condition.
Rare map of the Alaska Panhandle. This map is from a "most important work dealing with discoveries on the N.W. Coast of America. The author was a captain in the Russian navy and commander of the "Neva." He visited Kodiak and Sitka, wintering at the former island, and his long stay there gave him ample time and scope for a study of the native inhabitants and their habits and customs. The long chart shows the track of the voyage, and there are charts of the Washington Islands, Cadiack, and the Harbor of St. Paul, the coast from Bering’s Bay to Sea Otter Bay, Sitka or Norfolk Sound, etc.; with colored views of the Harbor of St. Paul in the Island of Cadiack. And New Archangel in Norfolk Sound. There are also plates of Indian implements, etc. The work is important also as the principal source for the Sitka Massacre" (Soliday 873).
SOLD

 

90. LISIANSKY, Urey (1773-1837)
[Map of the] Island of Island of Cadiack, with its Environs 1805 [From:] Voyage Round the World in the Years 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806 Performed by Order of His Imperial Majesty Alexander the First, Emperor of Russia in the ship Neva.

London: John Booth, 1814. A hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 27 x 20cm (10.5 x 8 inches). Matted map in very good condition.
Rare map of Kodiak Island. "Kodiak Island is a large island on the south coast of the U.S. State of Alaska, separated from the Alaska mainland by the Shelikof Strait. The largest island in the Kodiak Archipelago, Kodiak Island is the second largest island in the United States and the 80th largest island in the world" (Wikipedia).
This map is from a "most important work dealing with discoveries on the N.W. Coast of America. The author was a captain in the Russian navy and commander of the "Neva." He visited Kodiak and Sitka, wintering at the former island, and his long stay there gave him ample time and scope for a study of the native inhabitants and their habits and customs. The long chart shows the track of the voyage, and there are charts of the Washington Islands, Cadiack, and the Harbor of St. Paul, the coast from Bering’s Bay to Sea Otter Bay, Sitka or Norfolk Sound, etc.; with colored views of the Harbor of St. Paul in the Island of Cadiack. And New Archangel in Norfolk Sound. There are also plates of Indian implements, etc. The work is important also as the principal source for the Sitka Massacre" (Soliday 873).
SOLD

 

91. MACKENZIE, Alexander (1763/4-1820)
A Map of Mackenzie's Track, from Fort Chipewyan to the North Sea, in 1789. Map from "Voyages from Montreal, on the River St. Laurence, Through the Continent of North America, to the Frozen and Pacific Oceans; In the Years 1789 and 1793; With a Preliminary Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of the Fur Trade of that Country."

London, 1801. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca 60 x 55.5 cm. (23.5 x 22 inches) Repaired tear, original folds, otherwise a very good map.
This is an important map showing Mackenzie's route from Lake Athabasca to the Arctic Ocean via the Mackenzie River out of the account of the "earliest expedition made by a white man in this direction. [Mackenzie's] investigations, although pursued at so early a period of Arctic exploration, were remarkable for their accuracy; Sir John Franklin more than once expressed his surprise at being able to corroborate their correctness in his own exploration. Some Indian vocabularies are included" (Sabin 43414).


92. MACKENZIE, Alexander (1763/4-1820)
A Map of America, between Latitudes 40 and 70 North, and Longitudes 45 and 180 West, Exhibiting Mackenzie's Track from Montreal to Fort Chipewyan & from thence to the North Sea in 1789, & to the West Pacific Ocean in 1793. The Main map from: "Voyages from Montreal, on the River St. Laurence, Through the Continent of North America, to the Frozen and Pacific Oceans; In the Years 1789 and 1793; With a Preliminary Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of the Fur Trade of that Country."

London, 1801. Outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca 43.5 x 77 cm (17 x 30.5 inches). Original folds with some very mild offsetting, otherwise a near fine map.
This is the main map showing the discoveries and routes out of the account of the "earliest expedition made by a white man in this direction. [Mackenzie's] investigations, although pursued at so early a period of Arctic exploration, were remarkable for their accuracy; Sir John Franklin more than once expressed his surprise at being able to corroborate their correctness in his own exploration. Some Indian vocabularies are included" (Sabin 43414).

 

93. MAGUIRE, Herbert (1821-1895)
[Portrait of Sir Roderick Murchison with his Facsimile Signature]: Rod. I. Murchison.

[Ipswich]: [George Ransome], [1849]. Lithograph on Indian paper ca. 33.5 x 24 cm (13.5 x 9.5 inches), with large margins, blind stamp of Ipswich Museum on the lower margin. T. H. Maguire 1849 [signed on stone lower right.]; M. & N. Hanhart, Lith. Printers. With some edge wear, otherwise a very good lithograph.
Large lithographed portrait of noted geologist and geographer Sir Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871), shown with a hammer and eye-glass on a chord around his neck. "Murchison named and described the Silurian system and travelled extensively throughout Europe and Russia studying geological structures. He was one of the founders and a president of the Royal Geographical Society, director-general of the British Geological Survey and director of the Royal School of Mines and the Museum of Practical Geology" (Wikipedia).
"Thomas Herbert Maguire was an English artist and engraver, noted for his portraits of prominent figures. The well-known series of 60 scientific portraits by Maguire was privately commissioned by George Ransome, F.L.S., of Ipswich, in connection with the foundation of the Ipswich Museum (Portraits of the Honorary Members of the Ipswich Museum. Portfolio of 60 lithographs by T.H. Maguire. George Ransome, Ipswich, 1846-1852).
They were executed cumulatively between 1847 and 1852, as the Museum obtained fresh scientific sponsors. Some were made by the artist from life, and others from photographic portraits or (in the case of the Revd William Kirby) from an oil portrait. The exact total of this series is slightly above 60 because some (e.g. Edwin Lankester) were re-drawn. Copies of the lithographs were given to subscribing members of the Museum, and a bound portfolio copy of the series was presented by Professor J.S. Henslow to H.R.H. Prince Albert when he inspected the Museum on the occasion of the 1851 Ipswich Congress of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. George Ransome resigned his position as founding Secretary of the Museum in 1852 and the cumulative series was then discontinued" (Wikipedia).

 

94. MARA, Edward A.
Map of Canada and Part of the United States Compiled from the Latest Authorities.

Montreal: Leggo & Co, 1871. Partly hand coloured photo steam lithographed map ca. 93 x 144 cm (36.5 x 57 inches). Mounted on linen with a minor chip to upper middle blank margin, some minor chipping and abrasion of the printed surface, and lower right corner with some mild water staining, but overall a good map.
Very rare large scale map with Worldcat locating only one copy. Department of Agriculture Ottawa 1871: "Compiled and drawn by order of the Honorable C. Dunkin, Minister of Agriculture, under the Superintendence of Andrew Russell, P.L.S. By Edwd. A. Mara, draughtsman &c." The map shows national, provincial, and territorial borders and railroads, including the projected Canadian Pacific Railroad. A Historically important map which was one of the first maps and most likely the first Canadian produced map to show British Columbia as part of the confederation of Canada. "With the agreement by the Canadian government to extend the Canadian Pacific Railway to British Columbia and to assume the colony's debt, British Columbia became the sixth province to join Confederation on July 20, 1871" (Wikipedia).


95. MAY, Commander Walter William
A. Loss of the Mclellan [Plate II From the Rare]: "A Series of Fourteen Sketches made During the Voyage up Wellington Channel in Search of Sir John Franklin, K.C.H., and the Missing Crews of H.M. Discovery-Ships Erebus and Terror; together with a Short Account of Each Drawing."

London: Day and Son, May 1, 1855. Tinted lithograph with some added hand colouring, printed image ca. 20 x 30 cm (7.5 x 12 inches). Matted and closely cropped to image and with a small repaired tear, otherwise a very good lithograph.
"Walter William May, lieutenant on the Assistance, whose sketches would form the basis of a handsome plate book" (Howgego Polar Regions 1850-1940, B15). The Assistance was part of Sir Edward Belcher's expedition which searched the Wellington Channel (1852-54). Belcher's "expedition is distinguished from all other Arctic expeditions as the one in which the commanding officer showed an undue haste to abandon his ships when in difficulties, and in which one of the ships so abandoned rescued herself from the ice, and was picked up floating freely in the open Atlantic" (Oxford DNB); Abbey Travel II, 646.

 

96. MAY, Commender Walter William A.
H.M.S. Assistance, in tow of Pioneer, Passing John Barrow Mount, North of Wellington Channel, 1853 [Plate IV From the Rare]: "A Series of Fourteen Sketches made During the Voyage up Wellington Channel in Search of Sir John Franklin, K.C.H., and the Missing Crews of H.M. Discovery-Ships Erebus and Terror; together with a Short Account of Each Drawing."

London: Day and Son, May 1, 1855. Tinted lithograph, printed image ca. 20 x 30 cm (7.5 x 12 inches) Matted lithograph in very good condition.
"Walter William May, lieutenant on the Assistance, whose sketches would form the basis of a handsome plate book" (Howgego Polar Regions 1850-1940, B15). The Assistance was part of Sir Edward Belcher's expedition which searched the Wellington Channel (1852-54). Belcher's "expedition is distinguished from all other Arctic expeditions as the one in which the commanding officer showed an undue haste to abandon his ships when in difficulties, and in which one of the ships so abandoned rescued herself from the ice, and was picked up floating freely in the open Atlantic" (Oxford DNB); Abbey Travel II, 646.

 

97. MAYER, Luigi (1755-1803) and BOWYER, Robert (1758-1834)
View of Constantinople.

London: R. Bowyer, 1812. Double-page hand coloured aquatint, printed image ca. 26 x 52 cm (10.5 x 21 inches). Original centre fold. Small foxing spots along the fold, otherwise in very good condition.
Beautiful large panoramic view of Constantinople from Luigi Mayer’s "Views in the Ottoman Dominions, in Europe and Asia," engraved by Robert Bowyer (London, 1810). This later imprint was published two years after the first edition. Seven people and a house are visible in detail in the foreground, with horse riders, houses, water, boats and hills in the background.
Luigi Mayer (1755-1803) was an Italian-German artist and one of the earliest and most important late 18th century European painters of the Ottoman Empire. He was a close friend of Sir Robert Ainslie, 1st Baronet, a British ambassador to Turkey between 1776 and 1792, and the bulk of his paintings and drawings during this period were commissioned by Ainslie. He travelled extensively through the Ottoman Empire between 1776 and 1794, and became well known for his sketches and paintings of panoramic landscapes of ancient sites from the Balkans to the Greek Islands, Turkey and Egypt, particularly ancient monuments and the Nile. Many of the works were amassed in Ainslie's collection, which was later presented to the British Museum, providing a valuable insight into the Middle East of that period (Wikipedia); Abbey Travel 371; Tooley (1954) 321; Atabey 789.

 

98. MERCATOR, Gerard (1512-1594), & Hondius, Jodocus (1563-1612)
[Map of Equatorial Africa] Abissinorum Sive Pretiosi Ioannis Imperiu.

Amsterdam, 1607. Copper engraved map, full hand colouring ca. 34 x 49cm (13.5 x 19 inches) Original centre fold, otherwise a very good map.
Lake Zair and Zarian are depicted as the sources of the Nile in this map of the kingdom of the mythical Prester John. Prester John was the central African King believed by the Crusaders to have converted to Christianity, and thus this area became a popular subject of map-makers. There is also a large inset of the Congo. A very nicely hand colored, strong impression. "The legendary kingdom of the Christian Prester John is the central focus of this impressive map of central Africa. It is cartographically similar to Ortelius' map, based on the travels of the Portuguese explorer, Francisco Alveres, who searched for the mythical kingdom in 1520. The kingdom itself is shown atop the Amara Mons in the region that Alvares encountered the Coptic Christian ruler David II. The large inset of the Congo region, also based on Ortelius, illustrates the travels of another Portuguese explorer, Duarte Lopez. The Nile is shown with its source in the Ptolemaic twin lakes of Zaire and Zaflan, at the foot of the Mountains of the Moon (Lunae Montes)" (Old World Auctions).Van der Krogt Koeman I, p.713.

 

99. MERCATOR, Rumold (1545-1599)
[Double Hemisphere World Map] Orbis Terrae Compendiosa Descriptio ex ea, quam ex Magna Universali Mercator Rumoldus fieri curabat in hac comodiore forma a Hieron: Porro redact.

Cologne, 1597. Uncoloured copper engraved map ca. 16 x 24 cm. (6.5 x 9.5 inches) Matted, closely cropped with no loss of printed surface, with four small wormholes and with original folds, otherwise map in very good condition.
"Rumold Mercator's double-hemispherical world map has been re-engraved in reduced format by Girolamo Porro. It is to the artist's credit that so much detail has been represented with such fineness and clarity" (Shirley 194 & 202).
"This double hemisphere world map is derived from the 1587 world map by Rumold Mercator and set within a similar strapwork background with an armillary sphere and compass rose tucked between the hemispheres. The North Pole is depicted as a landmass surrounding a sea from which four rivers radiate and there is a well depicted Northwest Passage. In the Antarctic is the imaginary southern continent and there is a bulge in the southwest coast of South America. The map was engraved by Girolamo Porro for Giovanni Magini and included in several of Magini's works, as well as those of Quad and Gothard in the early part of the seventeenth century. The map is finely engraved with stippled sea area, text in Latin below and blank verso" (Old World Auctions).

 

100. MERIAN, Matthaeus (1593-1650)
[Bird's-Eye View of Goa]: Goa.

Frankfurt am Main, Ca. 1649. Copper engraved plan, printed image ca. 27 x 35,5 cm (11 x 14 inches). With original centre fold, otherwise a very good map.
Large folding bird’s-eye view of Goa from one of the German editions of Pierre d’Avity’s "Neuwe Archontologia Cosmica," most likely 3rd edition (Frankfurt am Main, 1st ed. - 1638, 2nd ed. - 1646, 3rd ed. - 1649). The map is supplemented with an extensive index in a decorative cartouche in the right upper corner.
"First published in French in 1614 under the title Les empires, royaumes, estats ... Et principautez du monde, the work was translated by Johann Ludwig Gottfried (which is not a pseudonym of J.P. Abelin as has often been supposed). It is divided into three parts: the first deals with Europe, the second with Asia and Africa and the third with the Knights of Malta" (Christie’s). Sabin 28070.

 

101. MOHUN, Edward (1838-1912)
Map of the Province of British Columbia Compiled and Drawn by Edward Mohun, C.E. By Direction of the Honorable W. Smithe, Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.

Victoria B.C.: Lands and Works, 1884. Map lithographed and printed in four colours ca. 49 x 56 cm (19 x 22 inches). Map mounted on linen and housed in period dark green gilt tooled straight-grained full sheep covers. Covers mildly worn at extremities and spine chipped at head and foot and hinges cracked, otherwise a very good map in very original condition.
Worldcat only locates eleven copies of this rare map which shows the soon to be completed Canadian Pacific Railway. The map was engraved and printed in Edinburgh by J. Bartholomew and was published by the Dawson Brothers in Montreal.
Edward Mohun "arrived in Victoria in June of 1862. He was married to Emmeline Jane Newton (widow of W.H. Newton) in New Westminster in 1878. From 1863-1871 he worked as a surveyor throughout Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, Fraser Valley and Haida Gwaii. In 1871 and 1872 he was a the Canadian Pacific Railway Divisional Engineer of the "H Party" in charge of surveying the Yellowhead and Eagle Pass. Mohun was appointed as a surveyor to the Joint Indian Reserve Commission in 1876. He surveyed reserve allotments throughout Vancouver Island and the coastal areas. In 1884, with the direction of the Honourable W. Smithe, Chief Commissioner of Lands and works, Mohun created a map of the Province of British Columbia" (Federal and Provincial Collections of Minutes of Decision, Correspondence, and Sketches Online). The covers were produced by M.W. Waitt & Co., a printer and publisher established in Victoria BC in 1877, who sold the map.


102. MOORE, Lieutenant Joseph
View of the Lake and Part of the Eastern Road from Rangoon, taken from the Advance of the 7th Madras Native Infantry.

London: Kingsbury & Co., and Thos. Clay, 1825. Hand coloured aquatint by H. Pyall, numbered 'No. 11' upper right. Image size 37 x 25,5 cm (14.5 x 10 inches). Blank outer margins slightly faded, a few minor tears neatly repaired, otherwise a very good uncut aquatint.
Plate 11 from the first series of Moore's "Rangoon Views, and Combined operations in the Birman Empire" (2 series, 1825-26), illustrating the British campaign during the First Anglo-Burmese War (1824-1826). "The war, which began primarily over the control of north-eastern India, ended in a decisive British victory, giving the British total control of Assam, Manipur, Cachar and Jaintia as well as Arakan and Tenasserim" (Wikipedia). This plate is dedicated to the Battle of Yangon (May-December 1824). Abbey Travel 404; Tooley (1954) 334.

 

103. MORSE, Samuel Finley Breese (painted by) (1791-1872)
Owyhean Youths: Thomas Hoopoo, George Tamoree, William Tenooe, John Honoree. The profits rising from the sale of this print of four Owyhean youths will be applied to the Sandwich Islands missions.

New Haven, Con.: N. & S.S. Jocelyn, 1822. Uncoloured copper engraving ca. 27 x 22 cm (11 x 9 inches). Matted engraving with flattened folds and minor restoration of non-printed surface, otherwise a very good copper engraving.
Extremely rare copper engraved portrait of four Hawaiian boys, wearing traditional Western dress, as no original copy found in Worldcat. The print was issued with the pamphlet "A Narrative of Five Youths from the Sandwich Islands" (1st ed., 1816) to raise money for the American missionary activity in Hawaii.
One of the youths was famous George Prince Kaumualii (Tamoree, initially Humehume) (ca. 1798-1825), a son of the king of the part of the Hawaiian Islands. He traveled widely, served in the U.S. Military, was a hero of the War of 1812, embraced Christianity and took part in the first missionary movement in Hawaii. In 1817 George Prince and four other Hawaiians became first students of the Foreign Mission School (Connecticut, 1817-1826), and their portraits were drawn by a painter and inventor Samuel Morse.
"From its founding, the school rapidly became a symbol of American Christianity's Second Great Awakening, and connected the small farm town of Cornwall in Connecticut's Litchfield Hills to the early 19th century's clash of civilizations, as epitomized by the Trail of Tears, the conversion of Hawaii to Protestantism, and the worldwide Christian missionary movement.
Henry Opukahaia, the school's first pupil, was an 18 year old Native Hawaiian abandoned in New Haven, Connecticut in 1810 by his ship. He traveled widely to promote the school, but died in Cornwall in 1818 at 26 before he could return home. He recruited four more Hawaiians, including one who called himself "George Prince" with a record of fighting in the War of 1812, and the school printed a pamphlet with their stories to raise money. Samuel F. B. Morse, son of Jedidiah, painted their portraits" (Wikipedia).

 

104. MUENSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552)
[Map of the Caucasus] Tabula Asiae III: Tertia Asiae Tabula continent Colchidem, Iberiam, Albaniam & Armeniam Maiorem.

[Basel]: [Heinrich Petri], [1552]. Hand coloured copper engraved map, printed image ca. 26,5 x 33,5 cm (10.5 x 13.5 inches). Map title ‘Tabula Asiae III’. J. De Bis sculp. Latin text (title of the map) on verso. With original centrefold, age toned, minor stains, otherwise a very good map.
A map from 1552 edition of Claudius Ptolemaeus' "Geographia" edited by Muenster. The map shows the territories of modern Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan, with the parts of the Black and Caspian Seas. Noah’s Ark is placed in the Caspian Sea with the text "Arca Noe, que quieuit in motibus Armenie." A decorative text box in the right lower corner lists the main cities of each country (Colchide, Albania and Armenia).
"Fourth edition of Sebastian Munster's edition of Ptolemy, with an additional treatise and enlarged indices by Konrad Wolffhart. 48 of the maps were first used in Munster's first 1540 edition, six were added for the third edition of 1545, and one, the map of Pomerania (no. 42), appears here for the first time, replacing a map of the Lake of Constance. Munster's celebrated map of the New World (map 54) appears here in its 6th state, with latitude and longitude bars added in the margins (Burden 12). Of the 54 woodcut maps half are Ptolemaean, the remainder modern (world, the American continent, the East Indies and regions in Europe, Asia and Africa)" (Christie’s); Phillips Atlases 370.


105. MUENSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552)
Affricae Tabula Nova [New Map of Africa].

Basle, 1580. Uncoloured wood block map, printed image ca. 36 x 31cm (13 x 14.5 inches) Some restoration of margins and some minor soiling to lower corners, otherwise a very good map.
"This map could be regarded as coming from the second edition of Muenster: the addition of a portion of the coast of Portugal makes it recognisable as such. The technique of the drawing is different from the Muenster woodcuts of Africa. The coastline is jagged, with prominent bays, there are many large lakes and rivers and the geography is somewhat fictitious except for certain well-known places and rivers. There are two small sailing vessels and one sea monster. The left lower cartouche is a simple rectangular, slightly ornamented box containing the title in a florid calligraphy which is also used for the place names" (Norwich 14).

 

106. OWEN, Jones (1809-1874)
[Two Plates of Egyptian Temples in Luxor and Karnak]: El Uxor. Plate IX; Great Temple Karnak. Thebes. Plate XI.

London: Graves and Warmsley, 1843. Two tinted lithographs with some hand colouring, printed images ca. 32 x 42 cm (12.5 x 16.5 inches) and 44,5 x 29,5 cm (17.5 x 11.5 inches). Both mounted in recent matting. With the original letterpress explanatory text leaves mounted on verso. Overall near find lithographs.
Plates IX and XI from Owen’s "Views on the Nile from Cairo to the Second Cataract drawn on stone by George Moore, from sketches taken in 1832 and 1833 by Owen Jones and the late Jules Goury. With historical notices of the monuments by Samuel Birch." The plates show the main entrance to the temple of Luxor, and two panoramas of the Great Temple of Karnak taken from the north and the south.
"In Greece [Jones] met the French architect Jules Goury ... And the two travelled together until Goury's death from cholera in 1834. Their travels in Egypt were later the subject of Views on the Nile (1843), in which, as in so many travel books of the time, the Nilotic journey was the organizing narrative for a series of picturesque views" (Mark Crinson, Empire Building: Orientalism and Victorian Architecture) (Bonhams).
"Owen Jones, architect and ornamental designer, visited part of Greece, Alexandria, Cairo, Thebes and Constantinople in 1833. Sixteen of the plates are from sketches by Jones, fifteen by Jules Goury, who later died of cholera while collaborating with Jones on his study of the Alhambra at Granada. The descriptions were written by Samuel Birch" (Sotheby’s).
"Mr. Owen established his reputation as an architectural draughtsman by his superb work on the Alhambra; and his coadjutor Jules Goury was a very accomplished artist, who studied architecture, that of Egypt in particular, thoroughly.., The size of the plates is favourable for conveying an idea of the gigantic scale of Egyptian art.., The descriptive notices by Mr. Birch are valuable and contain information derived from the best sources; adding greatly to the interest of the volume, by throwing light on the origin and purpose of the different monuments, and the date of their erection" (The Spectator. Vol. 16. London, 1843, p. 572).


107. PETIT-THOUARS, Abel Aubert Du (1793-1864)
Panorama de la Baie de Papéiti (ile d'Otaïti), pris du Mouillage de la Vénus [Panoramic View of Papeete Bay, Tahiti, taken from the Venus at Anchorage].
Paris: Gide, [1841]. Double-sheet hand-coloured lithograph ca. 22 x 101cm (9 x 40 inches) With a chip to bottom far left blank margin and a couple of small tears and minor creasing of blank margins not affecting printed surface. Overall a very good lithograph.
This is a scenic and important view from the "Voyage autour du Monde sur la frégate la Vénus pendant les années 1836-1839" (Paris, 1840-46 ; 9 vols. text and 4 vols. atlas).
"This voyage, ostensibly to report on the whale fisheries in the Pacific, was political in nature. The presence of the frigate Vénus in ports around the world would be of value to French commerce and diplomacy. After rounding Cape Horn, the expedition made calls up the coast of South America, to Hawaii, Kamchatka, and to California in order to assist French traders who had been clamouring for support for some time. Dupetit-Thouars' account of his stay in California, in 1837, is one of the most important and complete records of the Mexican period. In 1838, the Vénus made a run for Easter Island, further investigated the coast of South America, then sailed for the Galapagos and Marquesas Islands, Tahiti, and New Zealand. At Tahiti, the expedition forced Queen Pomaré to write to the King of France apologizing for mistreatment of French priests, to pay an indemnity, and to salute the French flag. He had also made a treaty with Kamehameha III of Hawaii. After visits to Sydney and Mauritius, the ship sailed home, arriving after a voyage of thirty months. Abel du Petit-Thouars, nephew of the famed French botanist Louis du Petit-Thouars (1758-1831), is credited with bringing the Marquesas under French protection (1842), as well as the society islands (1843), and he was made a vice-admiral in 1846" (Hill 518).


108. RAMUSIO, Giovanni Battista (1485-1557)
[Map of Western Africa] Parte del Africa.

Venice, 1565. Uncoloured wood block map ca. 27.5 x 38.5 cm. (11 x 15 inches). With original centre fold, otherwise in near fine condition.
"Compiled by Venetian cartographer, Gastaldi, it appears in the third volume of Ramusio's Delle Navigatione e Viaggi" (Norwich 314). "Superb woodblock map of Western Africa compiled by the Venetian cartographer Gastaldi and published in this important 16th century description of voyages of discovery. The map covers from the Tropic of Cancer to the Equator and is filled with mountains and a variety of different trees, animals and natives. The sea is alive with sea monsters, native canoes and two European ships. Along the coast of Guinea is a scene of natives paying homage to a chieftain and below that is the Portuguese fort, Castel de la Mina (modern Elmina), which was founded in 1482 and became the major export center for African gold. The Senegal and Gambia Rivers and the Rio Grande are linked with the Niger River" (Old World Auctions).


109. REICHARD, C[hristian] G[ottlieb] [Theophil] (1758-1837)
[Map of the North Pacific Including Eastern Asia and Western America] Der Noerdliche Theil des Grossen Welt Meeres nach den Neuesten Bestimmungen und Entdeckungen.

Weimar: L. Industrie Comptoirs, 1803. Outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 50 x 67 cm (20 x 26.5 inches). Original centre fold, a couple of other old folds, otherwise a very good map.
"Expansive map of the North Pacific including Japan, Kamchatka, Alaska and Canadian west coast, Hawaii and the Mariana Islands. The map is centered roughly on the Aleutian Islands and shows excellent coastal detail in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, with the names given to the region by Vancouver including New Norfolk, New Cornwall, New Hanover, New Georgia and the outdated name of New Albion for the California coast" (Old World Auctions). Includes Mackenzie's discoveries. Tooley's Mapmakers Q-Z, p. 27.

 

110. RENNELL, James (1742-1830)
Memoir of a Map of Hindoostan; Or the Mogul Empire: With an Introduction, Illustrative of the Geography and Present Division of that Country... To Which is Added, an Appendix, Containing an Account of the Ganges and Burrampooter Rivers.

London: M. Browne, for the Author, 1788. First Edition. Quarto. cxi, [i], 295, [51] pp. With four copper engraved maps, all but one folding. Period speckled brown full calf with maroon gilt label. Hinges cracked but holding, extremities rubbed, otherwise a very good copy.
Rennell's "maps were of the greatest importance.., He was a close friend of Sir Joseph Banks, the eminent naturalist. Admiral Markham remarks of him that he was the greatest geographer that Great Britain has yet produced" (Cox I, p302). "In 1764 Rennell was appointed Surveyor-general for Bengal, and supervised much of the early mapping of eastern India, work which culminated in the publication in 1780 of his famous Bengal Atlas. He left India in 1777 and after returning to London devoted himself to the study of geography"(Howgego R29). "Rennell's general map of India, first published as ‘Hindoostan’ in 1782 and dedicated to Sir Joseph Banks, was, on the other hand, a compilation of the surveys, reports, and sketches of others, and subject to constant revision by him. Two versions of the map were published, in 1782 and 1788, the first with two editions of Memoir of a Map of Hindoostan, the second with three editions to 1793 of a new Memoir and various appendices. Rennell was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1781, and awarded the society's Copley medal in 1791" (Oxford DNB).


111. RENNELL, James (1742-1830)
Map of Bengal and Bahar in VIII Parts [A Bengal Atlas: containing maps of the theatre of war and commerce on that side of Hindostan : compiled from the original surveys, and published by order of the Honourable the Court of Directors for the affairs of the East India Company].

[London]: J. Rennell, [1781]. First Edition. Folio. Copper engraved title page (dated 1779), contents leaf and twenty-one copper engraved folding views and maps. Period style brown gilt tooled half calf with marbled boards and maroon gilt label. Contents leaf and several maps mounted, some maps with repaired chipped edges (some with minor loss of printed surface, several maps with repaired tears, overall a quite heavily restored but good copy.
Rennell's "maps were of the greatest importance.., He was a close friend of Sir Joseph Banks, the eminent naturalist. Admiral Markham remarks of him that he was the greatest geographer that Great Britain has yet produced"(Cox I, p302). "In 1764 Rennell was appointed Surveyor-general for Bengal, and supervised much of the early mapping of eastern India, work which culminated in the publication in 1780 of his famous Bengal Atlas. He left India in 1777 and after returning to London devoted himself to the study of geography"(Howgego R29). "In England in 1778 Rennell proposed a new set of maps of Bengal to replace the inadequate small-scale maps published by the East India Company from his earlier surveys, and, with the guarantee of a bulk order from the company, had plates engraved to publish A Bengal Atlas first in 1780. The bulk consignment, en route for India for the use of company officials, was captured at sea by French and Spanish ships, and Rennell produced a new enlarged Atlas, with river maps and tables of distances, in 1781. A Bengal Atlas remained the standard administrative map of Bengal for almost fifty years, the river maps being pirated in Calcutta in 1825, and the last recorded London reprint appearing in 1829 or 1830" (Oxford DNB).


112. ROBERTS, David (painted by), (1796-1864)
Baalbec (Ruins of the Temple of the Sun, - Mount Lebanon in the Distance). To the Right Honorable and most Reverend J. B. Sumner D.D. Archbishop of Canterbury This Print is by Permission Respectfully Dedicated by his Grace's Obliged and Obedient Servant J. Hogarths.

London: Joseph Hogarth, 1849. Uncoloured copper engraving, printed image ca. 30 x 37,5 cm (12 x 15 inches). Engraved by J. Pye. Some very mild foxing, otherwise a very good copper engraving.
Steel engraving after Robert’s painting of Baalbec shows the landscape "with ruins of the Temple of the sun at Baalbec in the middle distance, figures amongst piles of columns and sections of a frieze in the foreground, including a solitary figure sitting at left, smoking a pipe; an encampment at left, and mountains in background. <..,> Etching and engraving on chine collé" (British Museum on-line).
David Roberts was a Scottish painter especially known for a prolific series of detailed lithograph prints of Egypt and the Near East that he produced during the 1840's from sketches he made during long tours of the region (1838-1840). He travelled "via Alexandria to Cairo, before visiting the pyramids at Giza. Hiring a cangia, he sailed up the Nile as far as Abu Simbel, stopping on his return north to sketch temples and ancient sites such as Philae, Karnak, Luxor, and Dendera. Back in Cairo he drew its streets and mosques before departing for Syria and Palestine in February 1839. He travelled through Sinai to Petra and thence north, via Hebron and Jaffa, to Jerusalem. From there he made an excursion to the Jordan, the Dead Sea, and Bethlehem and, after spending a further week in Jerusalem, he continued north, visiting many places associated with the Bible, before exploring Baalbek. He sailed for England from Beirut in May 1839." He was the first independent, professional British artist to travel so extensively in the Near East, and brought back 272 sketches, a panorama of Cairo, and three full sketchbooks, enough material to ‘serve me for the rest of my life’ (Roberts, eastern journal, 28 Jan 1839).
Over the next decade Roberts made ‘a series of entire new drawings’ for the 247 large coloured lithographs executed by Louis Haghe for The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt & Nubia (1842-9). No publication before this had presented so comprehensive a series of views of the monuments, landscape, and people of the Near East. The works remain keenly sought after to this day. Copies of the lithographs likewise remain popular, both as market-stall souvenirs or in travel advertisements, and in facsimile editions" (Oxford DNB).

 

113. SANTINI, François
[Map of the Russian Discoveries in the North Pacific] Carte des Nouvelles Découvertes au Nord de la Mer du Sud, tant a l’Est de la Sibérie et du Kamchatka, qu’a l’Ouest de la Nouvelle France [Map of the New Discoveries on the North of the South Ocean, Eastern Siberia and Kamchatka, and on the West of the New France].

Venice: M. Remondini, 1784. Copper engraved map, contemporary outline colour ca. 45 x 63 cm (17.5x 25 inches). Original centre fold. Decorative title cartouche top centre, flanked by "Avertissement" and "Echelles de Lieux" in top border, with "Habitant du Kamtchatka" in left corner, "Sauvage du NO de la Louisiane" in right corner. Prime meridians: Paris; Isle de Fer. Nice wide margined map.
Later edition of the map by Joseph-Nicola Delisle, originally drawn by Philippe Buache in 1752; it shows the Northern hemisphere from Siberia in Asia to New France in North America, with the routes of discovery in the Northern Pacific Ocean. The legendary "Mer de l’Ouest'" and the mythical discoveries of Admiral de la Fonte also included. Wagner, H. (NW) 566; Tooley, R.V. (Amer) p.35, #104 (Chez M. Remondini added to Santini imprint); Kershaw, K.A. #1225.


114. SAYER, Robert (1725-1794)
& FLEURIEU, Charles Pierre Claret, comte de (1738-1810)
A New General Chart of the Atlantic or Western Ocean and Adjacent Seas, including the coasts of Europe and Africa... And also the opposite coast of America... In which also particularly distinguished the Determinations of the longitude as Given by the Marine Clocks of Mr. Ferdinand Berthoud, in the voyage performed by order of the Government of France in 1768 and 1769, in the ship Isis to the Azores, Madera, the Canaries, Cape-Verd Islands, St. Domingo, the Great Bank of Newfoundland etc. by M. De Fleurieu.

London: Robert Sayer and John Bennett, 1777. First edition, on two joined sheets. Large copper engraved map ca. 99 x 140,5 cm (39 x 55.5 inches). With some expertly repaired marginal tears, otherwise a very good map.
Very rare first edition of this map, with only three copies found in Worldcat.
"This huge large-scale map of the North Atlantic includes superb detail of the coastlines of the Americas, Europe and northern Africa. The chart is centered on a 32-point compass rose from which rhumb lines are arrays across the chart. There is a large inset of Hudson Bay" (Old World Auctions, 1794 edition of the map). The map shows the northern and equatorial parts of the Atlantic Ocean and marks sea currents and winds, depths and underwater rocks. The extensive ‘Advertisement’ contains information about the present map, as well as a discourse about principles of indication of underwater rocks, or Vigias on maps.
From the "Advertisement" (on map): "This Chart wherein the whole extent of the Atlantic Ocean is displayed on a Large Scale, is the Third of the Kind hitherto made public.., In composing the present Chart the Author has had many helps for the detail of the Coasts of the Atlantic, and they have been laid down from a great variety of terrestrial and marine admeasurements corrected by the best astronomic observations. As for the Hydrographic part properly so called not to mention a multiplicity of observations examined with the strictest attention, recourse has been had to several Journals of experienced Navigators, some of whose Tracks which appeared more peculiarly interesting have been inserted, especially that of Mr. De Fleurieu, which is not to be found in his chart which accompanies his excellent work, and which exhibits at a glance his observations relative to the variation of the Compass, together with his nautical remarks, etc."


115. SEUTTER, [Georg] Matthaeus (1647-1756)
ATLAS MINOR Praecipua Orbis Terrarum Imperia, Regna et Provincias, Germaniæ Potissimum..,

Augsburg, [ca. 1750]. Small Quarto. 68 pp. With a double page hand coloured copper engraved title page and 64 double page hand coloured copper engraved maps. Original publishers' brown flexible full sheep covers, title with decorative border blind stamped on front cover. Extremities with mild wear, leather flap with some cracks, some scattered mild staining on a couple of leaves, otherwise a very good copy in very original condition.
An attractive atlas with very decorative maps. "Most of the maps are reductions from Seutter's Atlas Novus and retain his signature. Some have been redrawn by Seutter's son Albrecht Carl and, in many cases, they have been engraved by his son-in-law Tobias Conrad Lotter. Lotter bought part of Seutter's publishing house in 1762 after the death of Albrecht Carl and, like Probst, continued to publish Seutter's maps" (Christies). The maps include: A world map, Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and all European Country and many detailed maps of Germany. "Georg Matthäus Seutter was one of the most important and prolific German map publishers of the 18th century.
"Seutter started his career as an apprentice brewer. Apparently uninspired by the beer business, Seutter left his apprenticeship and moved to Nuremberg where he apprenticed as an engraver under the tutelage of the prominent J. B. Homann. Sometime in the early 18th century Seutter left Homann to establish his own independent cartographic publishing firm in Augsburg. Though he struggled in the early years of his independence, Seutter’s engraving skill and commitment to diversified map production eventually gained him a substantial following. Most of Seutter’s maps were heavily based upon, if not copies of, earlier work done by the Homann and Delisle firms. By 1732 Seutter was one of the most prolific publishers of his time and was honored by the German Emperor Charles VI with the title of "Imperial Geographer." Seutter continued to publish until his death, at the height of his career, in 1757.
The Seutter firm continued under Seutter’s wastrel son Albrecht Carl until his death in 1762. Following Albrecht’s death, the firm was divided between the established Probst firm and the emerging firm of Tobias Conrad Lotter. Lotter, Matthäus Seutter’s son in law, was a master engraver and worked on behalf of the Seutter firm. Lotter would eventually become one of the most prominent cartographers of his day" (Wikipedia). Tooley Q-Z, p.150.


116. SEUTTER, George Matthaus (1678-1757)
[Map of Africa] Africa Juxta Navigationes et Observationes Recentissimas Aucta, Correcta et in Sua Regna et Status Divisa in Lucem Edita.

Augsburg: Engraved by Gottfried Rogg, 1728. Copper engraved map, full hand colour ca. 49 x 57cm (19.5 x 23 inches). Original centre fold. A near fine map.
"This map of Africa was published by George Matthaus Seutter, a German cartographer and publisher of Augsburg. In the lower left corner is a large decorative title cartouche engraved by Gottfried Rogg, with natives, pyramids, animals, lighthouses and ships. Although all the decorative animals have disappeared from the mainland the enormous lakes are shown in Central Africa and the information about the southern extremity of the continent is largely fictitious. The Nile is shown not only originating in the south at lakes Zaire and Zaflan, but also continuing further south, and the Abyssinian province of Amhara is shown in the kingdom of Monomotapa. This map is in fact crowded with erroneous detail" (Norwich 80).


117. SLATER, Joseph W.
Reginald Heber now Lord Bishop of Calcutta from a Drawing in the Possession of Sir T. D. Acland Bart. M.P. Drawn by J. Slater 1820 and Engraved by F. C. Lewis 1823.

[London], 1823. Uncoloured stipple engraving ca. 30 x 23 cm (12 x 9 inches) A very good wide margined engraving.
Very rare print with only one copy found in Worldcat.
"Reginald Heber (1783-1826) was an English clergyman, man of letters and hymn-writer who, after working as a country parson for 16 years, served as the Anglican Bishop of Calcutta until his sudden death at the age of 42. Heber took office as Bishop of Calcutta in October 1823. During his short episcopate he travelled widely in the areas of India within his diocese, and worked hard to improve the spiritual and general living conditions of his flock. However, a combination of arduous duties, hostile climate and indifferent health brought about his collapse and death while visiting Trichinopoly (now Tiruchirappalli), after less than three years in India. Monuments were erected to his memory in India and in St Paul's Cathedral, London" (Wikipedia).
Heber was highly interested in Indian life what resulted in his three volume work "Narrative of a Journey through the Upper Provinces of India from Calcutta to Bombay 1824-1825" (London, 1828, 3 vols.), an historically important contemporary record of India.

 

118. SPILSBURY, Francis B. (1756-1823)
Tripoli.

London: T.M. McLean, 1819. Hand coloured aquatint, printed image ca. 28,5 x 36,5 cm (11.5 x 14.5 inches). Minor crease in the image, otherwise a very good aquatint.
Sketched on the spot by D. Orme, Engraved by I.C. Stadler. Plate 18 from the second edition of Spilsbury’s "Picturesque Scenery In The Holy Land And Syria, Delineated During the Campaigns Of 1799 and 1800, 1803" (London, 1819; 1st ed. - 1803). The aquatint was prepared by Daniel Orme from Spilsbury's on-the-spot sketches.
Francis Spilsbury was a naval surgeon and participated in the British mission to the Mediterranean in 1799-1800 under command of Sir Sidney Smith. "The mission's task was to strengthen Turkish opposition to Napoleon and to assist the Turks in destroying the French army stranded in Egypt" (Wikipedia). Spilsbury served on Smith’s leading ship HMS Tigre and participated in the Siege of Acre.
See the description he gave to Tripoli in the "Picturesque Scenery": "Tripoli in Syria, according to tradition derived its name from the circumstances of its being formed by the junction of three cities contiguous to each other <...> The present town however is about a mile and a half from the site of the ancient one facing the Mediterranean Sea <..,>. Its situation is highly picturesque and romantic; the time-honoured summit of Lebanon, towering in sublime grandeur, at its back, while the mountain of Santa Crux presents itself on the left, the town appearing at a distance between the hills" (Spisbury. Picturesque Scenery: London, 1823, 3rd ed., p. 47-48); Abbey Travel 381; Blackmer 1585; Atabey 1168.

 

119. STODHARD, T. & [MEARES, John] (1756?-1809)
[NORTHWEST COAST OF AMERICA] Entrance to the Straits of John de Fuca.

London: J. Walter & Son, 1790. Hand coloured aquatint by J. Wells. Image size 24x45 cm (9 ½ x 18 in). Original folds flattened. A very good aquatint.
Plate 12 from Meares’ "Voyages in the Years 1788-'9 from China to the Northwest Coast of America," which was called "one of the early and fundamental books on the Northwest coast of America in general and on Alaska in particular" (Lada-Mocarski 46). "Meares’ voyages resulted in the Nootka Sound affair between Britain and Spain, and were the foundation of Britain’s claim to Oregon, later ceded to the United States" (Abbey Travel 594).
The Strait of Juan de Fuca, located at the southern entrance to Georgia Strait, separates Vancouver Island from Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and forms part of the international boundary. It was named by Capt Charles Barkley in 1787 after a Greek mariner who claimed to have discovered it in 1592. For 200 years the strait was considered the possible entrance to a Northwest Passage. De Fuca’s claims have always been doubted, but the name remains. The strait is susceptible to heavy weather and the Vancouver Island shoreline has been called "the Graveyard of the Pacific" (Encyclopaedia of British Columbia on-line); Cox Vol. II, page 29; Sabin 47260; Staton & Tremaine 612.

 

120. TARDIEU, Alexandre (1756-1844)
[Engraved Portrait of]: Jean François Galaup De La Pérouse, Chef d'Escadre des Armées Navales. Né à Alby en 1741.

[Paris], [1797]. Uncoloured copper engraving, printed image ca. 20,5 x 14 cm (8 x 5.5 inches). Paper edges slightly worn, but overall a very good wide margined engraving.
Engraved frontispiece portrait of a renowned French navigator Jean François de Galaup, comte de La Perouse (1741-1788) from "Voyage De La Pérouse Autour Du Monde" edited by L. A. Milet-Mureau (Paris, 1797, 4 vols. and Atlas).
Jean François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse (1741-1788?) was a French Navy officer and explorer whose expedition vanished in Oceania. In 1785 he took command of a French government expedition that was to search for the Northwest Passage from the Pacific side and to explore along the coasts of America, China, and Siberia and in the South Seas. In 1788 he sailed from Botany Bay and was lost at sea.

 

121. TARDIEU, Ambroise (1788-1841)
Atlas pour servir à l'Intelligence de l'Histoire Générale des Voyages, de Laharpe [Companion Atlas of the General History of Travels and Voyages by La Harpe].

Paris: Etienne Leroux, 1821. First edition. Folio. [iv] pp. With fifteen outline hand coloured maps (eleven double-paged). Period brown quarter sheep. Joints split, spine worn, some very minor damp staining and foxing of maps, otherwise a very good copy.
La Harpe produced one of the most important early 19th century French collections of travels and voyages and this companion Atlas contains the detailed and infomative maps to these travel accounts. The maps included are the World map, Africa, Asia, India, South-East Asia, Oceania, China & Japan, Siberia and Kamchatka, the Caribbean, Mexico, South America, Peru, Brazil, North America and Europe. Tooley's Mapmakers Q-Z, p. 249.


122. THÉVENOT, Melchisédech (c. 1620-1692)
Description de la Partie des Indes Orientales qui est sous la Domination du Grand Mogol [Description of the Part of East India which is under the Dominion of the Great Mogul].

[Paris], [1663]. Copper engraved map ca. 27 x 35,5 cm (11 x 14 inches). J. De His sculp. Original centre fold, with minor foxing, otherwise a very good map.
A map from Thévenot’s "Relation de Divers Voyages Curieux" (Paris, 1663-1696, 5 parts). The map shows northern and central India with Afghanistan and parts of the Himalaya, from the border with Persia in the west to Pegu city and Martaban River (modern Yangon River) in the east. A decorative cartouche with the coat of arms of the Great Mogul (a lion and sun) is placed in the right upper corner.
"The most comprehensive collection of voyages of discovery of its time, containing the first printed map of the Australian continent, with accounts of newly discovered and explored regions of the world from original manuscripts, printed texts and conversations. The accounts include travels in China, Japan, Thailand, Tartary, Mongolia, the Philippines, India, Egypt, Ethiopia, Arabia, Persia, Russia, America, the Pacific, New Guinea and New Holland" (Sotheby’s).
"Thevenot's notable compilation is substantially concerned with Asia and the East Indies with the latest notices of commercial and missionary voyages, many made by personal acquaintances whom Thevenot interviewed" (Christie’s).

 

123. THOMSON, John (Born 1777)
Chart of the Northern Passage Between Asia & America.

London: Engraved by Neele, 1816. Hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 50 x 59 cm (20 x 23.5 inches). Original centre fold, otherwise a very good map.
"Chart of the Bering Straits, showing the tracks of the ships of Bering and Cook, as well as recent discoveries around Vancouver Island. Inland is information gained during the explorations of MacKenzie from Slave Lake north to the Arctic Sea and west to the Pacific Ocean near Queen Charlotte's Sound. This second trip made MacKenzie the first European to cross America north of Mexico" (PBA).
"Very informative map showing the development of the Alaskan and northwest coastline. Alaska is still a bit misshapen with virtually no interior topography. The tracks of Cook's voyage in 1778 and 1779 are traced and in the Arctic is a note of McKenzie's discoveries. The watercourse from Slave Lake to the Arctic Sea is shown, along with interesting anecdotal notes ("Mountains with bright stones" and "According to Indian Report, a Sea a short way to the West"). Includes great detail of the Pacific coast with the exception of Puget Sound, which is quite tiny" (Old World Auctions). This map is from Thomson's 'New General Atlas' Plate 74. Tooley Mapmakers, Q-Z p.271.

 

124. VANCOUVER, Captain George (1757-1798)
Carte de la Partie de la Cote Nord-Ouest de L'Amerique. [A Chart Shewing Part of the Coast of N. W. America with the Tracks of His Majesty's Sloop Discovery and Armed Tender Chatham].

Paris: De l'Imprimerie de la Republique, [1800]. Uncoloured copper Engraving ca. 76 x 59cm (30 x 23 inches) Map with some old fold and crease marks, otherwise a very good impression with ample margins.
This is the main map, which shows the North Pacific coast from Kodiak Island to the Bay of San Francisco, from the rare folio atlas of the 1800 Paris First French edition of Captain George Vancouver's "Voyage de découvertes a l'Ocean Pacifique du Nord, et autour du monde".
"Vancouver, who had served on Captain Cook's second and third voyages, was made commander of a grand-scale expedition to reclaim Britain's rights, resulting from the Nootka Convention, at Nootka Sound, to examine thoroughly the coast south of 60' in order to find a possible passage to the Atlantic, and to learn what establishments had been founded by other powers. This voyage became one of the most important made in the interests of geographical knowledge" (Hill p. 304).


125. VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702)
[Map of Jamaica] Jamaica, Americae Septentrionalis Ampla Insula, Christophoro Columbo Detecta, in suas Gubernationes Peraccuratae Distincta.

Amsterdam, [1680]. Full hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 51 x 60 cm. (20 x 23.5 inches). Cropped closely at the top border with some very minor loss of printed surface, original centre fold, otherwise a very good map.
This detailed map of Jamaica was finely engraved by L. V. Anse. The Island is divided into its precincts and the forests and mountains are shown. Elaborate cartouche with a mermaid, cherubs and cornucopia over-flowing with coins. Kapp 26.Tooley's Mapmakers Q-Z, p.332.

 

126. WALTON, Robert (1618-1688)
[Set of Four Continental Maps] A New, Plaine, and Exact Map of America ... [in set with] A New Plaine, and Exact Map of Africa ... [and] A New Plaine and Exact Map of Asia ... [and] A New Plaine and Exact Map of Europe..,

London, ca. 1660. Second States. Four uncoloured copper engraved maps each ca. 42 x 53 cm. (16.5 x 21 inches). Maps with original folds and with margins occasionally cropped close to the plate marks but with no loss of printed surface, a little aged toned, otherwise the maps are in very good original condition.
Set of four extremely rare and important separately published continent maps. Worldcat locates two copies of America, two copies of Asia and one copy of Europe. All maps with portraits and views on all sides. "Robert Walton was one of a handful of map publishers in London during the 1650s. In 1656 he produced a world map and having clearly perceived a market for a set of the continents, completed them in 1658. The American map is derived from the sixth state of Pieter van der Keere's map issued by Nicolaas Visscher, 1652.., The fascinating depiction of California attempts to balance the many theories of the time.., A further improvement is the inclusion of Hudson Bay, which was found on the van den Keere but only ever in the inset not in the main body of the map.., [These] rare map[s] [are] not known to have been intended for any book although [they] have been found inserted into examples of Heylin's Cosmographie and Varenius' Cosmography and Geography.., State 2.., The portrait of Cromwell on the Europe map was replaced by that of [Charles II]" (Burden 330).


127. WEBBER, John (1751-1793)
[COOK’S THIRD VOYAGE, 1776-1780] A View of the Habitations in Nootka Sound [Vancouver Island, BC].

[London]: [G. Nicol & T. Cadell], [1784]. Uncoloured copper engraving captioned "J. Webber del. S. Smith sculp." Printed image ca. 24 x 37.5cm (9.5 x 15 inches). Some minor foxing in blank margin, otherwise a very good wide margined engraving.
Plate 41 from the official account of Cook's third voyage "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean, Undertaken... For the Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere in 1776, 77, 78, 79 and 1780" (London, 1784; 3 vols. and atlas). A finely engraved village scene, the engraving shows Europeans trading with the native Indians. Their boat is on shore and in the background are the flat-roofed houses with salmon drying racks of the settlement.
"In March 1778, Captain James Cook of the Royal Navy landed on Bligh Island and named the inlet "King George's Sound". He recorded that the native name was Nutka or Nootka, apparently misunderstanding his conversations at Friendly Cove/Yuquot; his informant may have been explaining that he was on an island (itchme nutka, a place you can "go around"). There may also have been confusion with Nuu-chah-nulth, the natives' autonym (name for themselves). It may also have simply been based on Cook’s mis-pronunciation Yuquot, the native name of the place. The earlier Spanish and British names for the Sound swiftly went out of use" (Wikipedia).

 

128. WEBBER, John (1751-1793)
[COOK’S THIRD VOYAGE, 1776-1780] View of the Harbour of Taloo, in the Island of Eimeo.

London: Boydell & Co., 1809 [1820]. Hand coloured aquatint. Captioned on the lower margin "J. Webber fecit. Vide Cook’s last Voyage Vol. II. Chap. V." Printed image size ca. 28 x 41.5 cm (11 x 16.5 inches). Trimmed to near plate mark, otherwise a very good aquatint.
Plate 7 from the "Views in the South Seas from drawings by the late James Webber, draftsman on board the Resolution, Captain James Cooke, from the year 1776 to 1780" published by Boydell and Co in 1808. This plate with half the 1820 watermark showing in lower left blank margin.

"Webber was appointed at 100 guineas a year on 24 June 1776 and on 12 July he sailed from Plymouth in Cook's Resolution. His fame largely rests on his fine topographical and ethnographic work from the voyage, planned with Cook and with publication in view. Guided by the surgeon, William Anderson, he also drew natural history subjects (as did William Ellis, surgeon's mate and the other active draughtsman). He returned in October 1780, after Cook's and Anderson's deaths, with over 200 drawings and some twenty portraits in oils, showed a large selection to George III, and was reappointed by the Admiralty at £250 a year to redraw and direct the engraving of sixty-one plates, plus unsigned coastal views, in the official account. It appeared in June 1784 as A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean (3 vols, ed. J. Douglas). Webber also painted other views for the Admiralty, his last payment being in July 1785. He also published two sets of voyage prints; four aquatints made by Marie Catherina Prestel (1787-88: one repeating his own etching of 1786), and sixteen soft-ground etchings by himself (1788-92) of which more were probably intended. The latter were pioneering, both in the medium used and as an artist's rather than publisher's selection. Reissued in aquatint from about 1808 as Views in the South Seas, they continued to sell into the 1820s"(Oxford DNB).
Webber was the son of a Swiss sculptor who had emigrated to England. He was appointed as draughtsman to Cook’s third voyage (Abbey 595). Tooley 501; Holmes (Captain James Cook: A bibliographical excursion) 79.
This view of Taloo Harbor on Moorea, Tahiti, shows the Discovery & Resolution at anchor.
"The title page [of "Views in the South Seas"] is dated 1808 in all copies, but the plate imprints are dated April, 1809, and the water mark dates vary widely copy to copy" (Hill 1837).

 

129. WEBBER, John (1751-1793)
[COOK’S THIRD VOYAGE, 1776-1780] Balagans or Summer Habitations, with the Method of Drying Fish at St. Peter and Paul, Kamtschatka.

London: Boydell and Co., April 1st 1809, [1819]. Hand coloured aquatint on Whatman paper watermarked "1819" on the upper right blank margin. Printed image size ca. 29 x 41,5 cm (11.5 x 16.5 inches). Recently matted. A very good aquatint.
Plate 11 from the "Views in the South Seas from drawings by the late James Webber, draftsman on board the Resolution, Captain James Cooke, from the year 1776 to 1780" published by Boydell and Co in 1808. "The title page [of "Views in the South Seas"] is dated 1808 in all copies, but the plate imprints are dated April, 1809, and the water mark dates vary widely copy to copy" (Hill 1837). This plate depicts native inhabitants of Kamchatka and their method of drying fish during summer season.
"Webber was appointed at 100 guineas a year on 24 June 1776 and on 12 July he sailed from Plymouth in Cook's Resolution. His fame largely rests on his fine topographical and ethnographic work from the voyage, planned with Cook and with publication in view. Guided by the surgeon, William Anderson, he also drew natural history subjects (as did William Ellis, surgeon's mate and the other active draughtsman). He returned in October 1780, after Cook's and Anderson's deaths, with over 200 drawings and some twenty portraits in oils, showed a large selection to George III, and was reappointed by the Admiralty at £250 a year to redraw and direct the engraving of sixty-one plates, plus unsigned coastal views, in the official account. It appeared in June 1784 as A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean (3 vols, ed. J. Douglas). Webber also painted other views for the Admiralty, his last payment being in July 1785. He also published two sets of voyage prints; four aquatints made by Marie Catherina Prestel (1787-88: one repeating his own etching of 1786), and sixteen soft-ground etchings by himself (1788-92) of which more were probably intended. The latter were pioneering, both in the medium used and as an artist's rather than publisher's selection. Reissued in aquatint from about 1808 as Views in the South Seas, they continued to sell into the 1820s" (Oxford DNB).
Webber was the son of a Swiss sculptor who had emigrated to England. He was appointed as draughtsman to Cook’s third voyage (Abbey 595). Tooley 501; Holmes (Captain James Cook: A bibliographical excursion) 79.

 

130. WEBBER, John (1751-1793)
[Portrait of Captain Cook] Capt.n James Cook F.R.S. Painted at the Cape of God Hope, by J. Webber.

London: J. Webber, 1784. Stipple engraving in oval, printed image ca. 12x9,5 cm (5 x 4 inches). Painted at the Cape of Good Hope, by J. Webber. F. Bartolozzi R.A. Sculp. Publish'd as the Act directs, June 4th 1784. by J. Webber, No. 312, Oxford Street. Recently matted, trimmed inside plate mark and without publication line, otherwise a very good engraving.
Very rare engraving with only two copies found in Worldcat.
Engraved portrait of Captain James Cook by Francesco Bartolozzi (1727-1815) showing the famous navigator in uniform, turned three-quarters, head and shoulders in an oval surround. The engraving was made after the oil painting by John Webber (now in National Portrait Gallery, London), which was done at the Cape of Good Hope on Cook's third voyage, on the way out to the Pacific from England.
The plate was published in "Three voyages round the world, being a complete set of the plates of the three voyages... By J. Webber, W. Hodges and others; engraved by F. Bartolozzi and others" (London, ca. 1784-86, 2 vols.); and was used as a frontispiece in Andrew Kippis' "Life of Captain James Cook" (London, 1788).
Captain James Cook FRS RN (1728-1779) was an English explorer, navigator and cartographer, ultimately rising to the rank of Captain in the Royal Navy. Cook was the first to map Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean during which he achieved the first European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands as well as the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand.
Bibliography of Captain James Cook/ Ed. M.K. Beddie, 3596-3601.

 

131. WEBBER, John (1751-1793)
[COOK’S THIRD VOYAGE, 1776-1780] A View of Huaheine [Society Islands, French Polynesia].

[London: [G. Nicol & T. Cadell], [1784]. Uncoloured copper engraving captioned "J. Webber del. W. Byrne sculp." Printed image size ca. 24 x 46.5 cm (9.5 x 18.5 inches). A fine wide margined engraving.
Plate 31 from the official account of Cook's third voyage "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean, Undertaken... For the Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere in 1776, 77, 78, 79 and 1780" (London, 1784; 3 vols. And atlas). The plate shows the general view of the island with local boats and Resolution and Discovery in the harbour and was drawn by John Webber, the official artist of the expedition.
"The Society Islands are a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. They are politically part of French Polynesia. The archipelago is generally believed to have been named by Captain James Cook in honour of the Royal Society, the sponsor of the first British scientific survey of the islands; however, Cook states in his journal that he called the islands Society "as they lay contiguous to one another" (Wikipedia).

 

132. WEIGEL, Christoph (the Elder) (1654-1725) & Johann (died 1746)
[Map of Australia, the South Pacific, and Indonesia] Karte von Australien oder Polynesien, nach den Zeichnungen, Reisebeschreibungen und Tagebucher der Vorzuglichsten Seefahrer bis 1789 Entworffen im Jahr 1795.

Nuernberg: Weigel und Schneiderschen Handlung, 1795. Outline hand coloured copper engraved map ca. 47 x 66 cm (18.5 x 26 inches) Original centre fold, otherwise a very good map.
Map of Australia, the South Pacific, and Indonesia showing Australia with Tasmania joined to the mainland. The map shows the tracks of Tasman, Cook, Furneaux, Carteret, Wallis, Bougainville, Byron etc. "Hawkesburg River, Sidney Cove, Carmarthen Mountain &c. Inserted" (Tooley Australia 1331-2). Tooley's Mapmakers Q-Z, p.367.

 

133. WERNER, Carl Friedrich Heinrich (1808-1894)
[Karnak Temple Ruins].

[London]: [Hildesheimer & Faulkner], [1871-1875]. Mounted chromolithograph, printed image ca. 38,5 x 26,5 cm (15.5 x 10.5 inches). Mounting slightly soiled, otherwise a very good chromolithograph.
Lithographed by Gustave W. Seitz after Werner’s watercolour dated 1874. A plate from Werner’s "Nile-Sketches Painted from Nature During his Travels through Egypt" (London, 1871-75).
Carl Friedrich Heinrich Werner was a German watercolour artist. "He traveled through Spain in 1856 and 1857, and then in Egypt and Palestine from 1862 to 1864. Particularly notable were his watercolors in Jerusalem, where he was one of the few non-Muslims able to gain access to paint the interior of the Dome of the Rock. He published some watercolors from this trip in 1875 as Carl Werner's Nile Sketches. He later traveled to Greece and Sicily, and became a professor at the Leipzig Academy, dying in Leipzig in 1894" (Wikipedia); Blackmer Sale 1509.

 

134. WINTER, Johann Wilhelm
[Engraved Portrait of Johann Baptist Homann] Ioannes Baptista Homann Sac. Caes. Regq. Cath. Maj. Geographus, nec non Regiae Scientiarum Societatis Berolinensis Membrum.

Nuremberg, [1740]. Copper engraving on watermarked laid paper ca. 37 x 27 cm (14.5 x 10.5 inches). Caption on the lower margin reads "Ioannes Kenckel ad vivium pinxit. Jo. Wilhelm Winter sculpsit Noribergae." Trimmed to the plate mark, otherwise a very good engraving.
"Johann Baptist Homann (1664-1724) was a German geographer and cartographer.., In 1715 Homann was appointed Imperial Geographer of the Holy Roman Empire.., In the same year he was also named a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences.., In 1716 Homann published his masterpiece Grosser Atlas ueber die ganze Welt (Grand Atlas of all the World). Homann died in Nuremberg. He was succeeded by the Homann heirs company, in business until 1848, known as "Homann Erben", "Homanniani Heredes", "Heritiers de Homann" abroad" (Wikipedia); Tooley Mapmakers, vol. E-J, p.361.
Homann is shown with a compass measuring distances between different German cities, with bookshelves in the background.

 

135. WYLD, J[ames] (1790-1836)
European Dominions of the Ottomans or Turkey in Europe [Folding Map].

London: J. Wyld, 1824. First Edition. Engraved folding map, outline hand coloured, with an elaborate cartouche, mounted in segments on cloth ca. 78 x 57,5 cm (23 x 30 inches) The map is housed in a period maroon gilt titled quarter straight grained morocco slip case with marbled boards. Map in very good condition, slip case with mild wear of extremities.
James Wyld Senior was a noted map publisher, geographer and engraver, and the Royal Geographer, based at the Charing Cross. He succeeded mapmaker William Faden and reissued many of his maps. Wyld maintained the high standard of graphic and factual excellence that had been established by his predecessor and his maps are among the finest published in the early nineteenth century (Tooley, vol. Q-Z, 415-416). This map of the Ottoman Empire’s possessions in Europe includes the Balkans and Anatolia.

 

136. WYLD, James [the Younger] (1812-1887)
Map of China, Compiled from Original Survey Sketches.

London: James Wyld, 1840. Large outline hand-coloured engraved map ca. 62 x 80 cm (24.5 x 31.5 inches). The map is dissected into 20 sections and mounted on linen and housed in the original publishers' blue patterned cloth with the original printed paper label mounted on the front. Map in near fine condition.
A very detailed and accurate map of China during the First Opium War (1839-42), which ended with the cession of Hong Kong Island to the British with the Treaty of Nanking in 1842. The table provides details for the area and population of each province. This is one of the first maps to show Hong Kong.
The First Opium War "was fought between the United Kingdom and the Qing Dynasty of China over their conflicting viewpoints on diplomatic relations, trade, and the administration of justice. Chinese officials wished to control the spread of opium, and confiscated supplies of opium from British traders. The British government, although not officially denying China's right to control imports, objected to this seizure and used its military power to violently enforce redress. In 1842, the Treaty of Nanking the first of what the Chinese later called the unequal treaties granted an indemnity to Britain, the opening of five treaty ports, and the cession of Hong Kong Island, thereby ending the trade monopoly of the Canton System"(Wikipedia).
"In 1836, Wyld became the sole owner of the thriving family mapmaking business based in Charing Cross. His maps, which covered regions as diverse as London and the gold fields of California, were regarded highly, and Wyld himself had an excellent reputation as a mapmaker; he was elected as a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in 1839, and he was appointed Geographer to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert (as had been his father before him)" (Wikipedia); Tooley Q-Z, p. 417.






 
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